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DeanoL

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DeanoL last won the day on July 7 2014

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About DeanoL

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    Festival Freak

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  1. I think it's also to drive early demand. "The pre-sale went in ten minutes" - well of course it did it was only 5% of the tickets.
  2. Fair enough. I've probably said this before but part of what I like about how gigs are currently sold (in this country at least) is extraordinarily divorced from "who has the most money?" which applies pretty much everywhere else in life. To the point that I find it genuinely weird and delightful, and get quite sad when things like this, touting, VIP packages and so on erode it. The reality is, for most music/comedy gigs in the UK there is a single price (or two prices: standing and seated) that everyone pays. Getting to the front is down to getting there early or for seats being there the second they go on sale and getting through first. Yes, you need an internet connection, make yourself available at time of sale, be able to afford the base price, and be physically "fast" enough on a computer to do them. But that's a tiny list of requirements compared to anything else, and, touting aside, it's not easy to bypass by spending shit loads of money. The reality is, it's far easier for me to find someone and pay them to go queue up and buy me a ticket than it is to arrange a network of people to try online at 10am on the dot and somehow coordinate so I don't end up with multiple tickets. I remember seeing Flight of the Conchords on their last arena tour about 8 years ago, and them having a running joke about the people at the back in the "cheap seats" that didn't work because every seat had been sold for the same price. It's doubly weird that many theatres that do have tiered pricing for theatrical productions have flat pricing for comedy and music gigs, even in the same space. It's going away. Things are coming in, the "legitimised" touting where it seems the promoters are getting their own cut, the fan "VIP packages" and so on... but it's coming in in half measures. And I don't really get why. I don't get why every gig doesn't have a golden circle and charge the best part of a grand for front row seats. I genuinely can't believe we're somehow still in crazy town where anyone can get the best seats in the house if they're lucky. It's so at odds with absolutely everything else. And it'll be a real shame when it's gone. And yeah, I think a consequence of the current system is that perhaps the most deserving, the people willing to put in the most effort, don't necessarily get tickets over the more casual fans. It's just that any system that rewards effort in that way can normally be bypassed with money in a way the current system can't.
  3. That's the first flaw here though isn't it - you can buy up to four tickets, so the sale actually advantages 25% of the biggest fans and three of their mates, or people they sold the tickets on to at a profit. For non-sold-out gigs presumably you do box office on the night, for sold out gigs I guess it's still generally cheaper to buy off touts on the night than make two trips.
  4. I think where you see "bothered" I see "can afford". Can people afford to take time off work? Can the less able afford to the care to get them both to the gig and to the ticket sale? If you're loaded it's easy, you just pay someone to go buy the ticket for you. Might as well just make the tickets more expensive to start with. If they're too expensive for you you can always rearrange your life so you can afford it. I dunno, I just like the idea that if you eliminate the touts, the current system is close to outright eliminating the rich person advantage. Though of course even Glasto finds ways around that with resale of VIP passes having no regulation at all...
  5. I wasn't really counting the "can't be bothered" factor for either. Yeah it's more effort but the physical travel makes it harder than doing it online which will generally exclude people. As you mention, online systems can be biased against those with disabilities, but a travel and queue (overnight if necessary) system will impact a hell of a lot more disabled people. Likewise there will be more people that can't get or afford time off work to travel. Online systems give office workers an advantage over others, but a travel system is even tougher - if someone can't get the time off to book online they won't be able to get the day off to travel. Then the whole distance things compounds this - some of these bits can be overcome if someone lives near enough the venue or be far worse for those who don't.
  6. Right, but it's giving a far greater number of people less chance than the number of people it gives more chance. I get your point about having a variety of systems creating a fairer measure overall, though I have difficulty getting on board with it because not every show is equal... it's not really a great consolation if I can't get Springsteen tickets to say "yeah, but the system for Spice Girls tickets really favours you".
  7. Not really, there's other ways of getting spontaneity. If you want you can give me your holiday money for next year and I will book you somewhere random and send you the details a week before? I'd be absolutely gutted on behalf of the person behind me, who I would have turn around and look in the eye. I'd imagine there's a better than evens chance I would offer to sell the tickets on to them right there and then. I am not sure you would. Sure, if the show sold well and ended up turning people away you would, but for every show like that, you've got shows where people decided not to travel and book non-refundable travel, babysitting and hotels in advance because they might not get in, which undersell and end up selling tickets on the door to locals arriving after the support acts on the last stop of a pub crawl... (Or just as bad, people that did make plans in advance, didn't get in, are pissed off, and so go to another venue in the city to see a band they're not fussed about because they might aswell now travel etc. are already booked) I don't think there is any system that gives everyone an equal chance. A ballot comes close but still has issues. It's more about a system that gives the most people an equal chance. It certainly seems like this one gives fewer people such a chance than the usual one.
  8. DeanoL

    Plastic Bottle Ban?

    There's a difference between freedom of choice and being able to bring your own booze in though. I'd wager most people are bringing their own because of convenience/cost, not choice. I certainly find the range available at Glastonbury to be pretty damn good. Plus Eavis is on record as saying he wished people would drink less, and then they had that abrupt U-turn a few years back about how much booze you would be able to bring in.
  9. DeanoL

    Plastic Bottle Ban?

    Yeah I phrased that wrong. I meant from that weird thing a few years Glasto clearly don’t see the “punters can bring their own booze in” as the sort sacrosanct, major selling point of the festival that many on here do. So if they figure the best way to reduce plastic waste is to also just have a straight up ban on bringing in liquids they’ll do it. And I’m sure some of the loudest voices here in support of better measures around litter and recycling at Glastonbury will be shouting the loudest against it.
  10. DeanoL

    Plastic Bottle Ban?

    What's a reusable bottle? If I have a plastic water bottle and refill it over the weekend it's clearly not a single use bottle but it also is? There's a certain element of "be careful what you wish for" here. It seems like a really handy excuse to stop Glasto goers from bringing in their own booze at all (you can't have plastic or glass, so what are you going to keep it in?). (I know, cans, but that doesn't help when encouraging public transport too). Or maybe we'll see the option to purchase some cardboard containers for decanting with a limit of 2 litres per person or such. And yes, I to would think I was being overly paranoid were it not for the weirdness a few years back when they were talking about restrictions on how much booze you can bring in.
  11. DeanoL

    Plastic Bottle Ban?

    Well, not until it essentially runs out. Even if you're not environmentally conscious, it'll only be fifty years or so before we're looking back in disbelief at how much we wasted such a limited resource on just packaging.
  12. DeanoL

    Plastic Bottle Ban?

    I do find this quite weird. I mean, people do understand that plastic bottles are reusable too right? I mean not indefinitely but they will last a festival. I keep my water in a plastic bottle and refill it from the taps... I also think they will need more water points if they do this. There aren’t really many around the stalls areas. And essentially everyone who was previously buying bottled water will be joining the queues for the taps, which can already get quite bad.
  13. DeanoL

    Michael Eavis and his social housing project

    3/10 must try harder
  14. DeanoL

    Acts you don't "get"

    Mik Artistik
  15. DeanoL

    Which festivals will sell out quicker next year?

    Also perhaps the fact that the main stage area at H&G wasn't big enough to fit everyone (with a legit ticket) at the festival in. Even though all the other stages stopped before the headliners.
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