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  1. Update. I coincidentally saw them again today. Turns out they could source the hand sanitiser from China after all and actually ordered double the amount! It will keep for years so no problems there. They also said that at the mo the festival is going ahead as expected.
    23 points
  2. I don’t want to hijack your post, but I have a similar story, some of which might help. My wife Sue was in a hospice, terminally ill with cancer when tickets went on sale for Glastonbury 2016. From previous years the family (two sons, a daughter, plus friends and partners) had a Whatsapp group to organise tickets, and as we discussed who was going etc. we received a message from Sue in the hospice saying simply: “Planning a trip without me?” It was a tough reminder of the situation, but she clearly wasn’t well enough to go. Amazingly, we all got tickets, which meant we would all be together, but with one key person missing. By some miracle, the drugs she was taking started to control her pain and symptoms, and she was able to return home again. However, as the months wore on the cancer inevitably took hold once more, and she was readmitted to the hospice in late Spring. Despite this, she showed enormous resilience and was determined to continue to live life to the full. The family decided how wonderful it would be for her to come to Glastonbury for the first time. Looking back it was a crazy idea, but we all loved the place so much and knew she would too. She was keen, so we spoke to the doctors, and to our surprise they gave her permission to go. We didn’t get a ticket in the resale, unfortunately, so I wrote to Emily and See Tickets explaining the position, and to our surprise, See rang us and said they could provide a ticket. The hospice made extensive arrangements with the Glasto medical team and everything was put in place to make some unbelievable memories for the family. When we arrived, Greenpeace met us and allowed us to park within the festival site, and took us up to the hospital tent in a Land Rover, where we handed over the various drugs that we had been provided. Unfortunately, that made us late and we could only find a tent space directly behind Silver Hayes – the tent literally shook with drum and bass every night until 3 or 4 am. Somehow, though, we slept like logs. Every day we had to make the long walk up to hospital tent for injections and dressing changes, and this was the muddiest year on record. The staff were absolutely fantastic throughout. After each visit we rested in the Church marquee next door – neither of us were religious, but the people there were fabulously kind. Sue was really fan or R&B and Soul, but she watched Muse in awe – she had never seen anything like it. Coldplay were absolutely stunning and put on a spectacular show, and I have a wonderful final memory of us both watching Adele from the hill, clinging to each other in tears as those huge eyes on stage opened and she sang “Hello”. It was the most fantastic of festivals that year – not just the music, but the kindness and love we came across wherever we went. We have a wonderful video of us all together singing along to Madness “It Must be Love”. Afterwards, Sue returned to the hospice and somehow survived another 4 months. I returned to the church the following year to tell them what had happened and they remembered Sue well So I guess the moral of the story is to be prepared for the medical situation, which unfortunately may be a lot worse than it is right now. We certainly couldn't have coped without the fantastic medical team, who changed dressings, administered various drips and drugs, and gave us the confidence to take on what is quite a difficult environment , even for somebody in full health. I really hope it goes as well for you as it did for us - fantastic memories for the entire family
    14 points
  3. From last year, my first Glasto: At the Green Fields, some random guy playing Wonderwall: Listening to Worthy FM in the morning: Sunset at William's Green: At the temple: Stormzy: A lovely couple on The Other: Enjoying Liam: A good read: This kid enjoying a big crowd at Kylie: And The Cure:
    8 points
  4. I spoke to a member of the McCartney family (not connected to Paul in anyway, actually McCartneys Family Butchers in Dublin), and he thinks the festival is going to be cancelled. I also have a mate called Ross (not related to Diana) but I haven't spoke to him in ages so I don't know what he thinks to be honest. I can text him and ask if people want?
    7 points
  5. Can you please stop with this? I understand you're worried but posting absolutes on every thread like this is not helpful.
    7 points
  6. You’re the worst person for posting in this thread. Weren’t you just last week panicking about the religious impact when the pope died? And he didn’t even have the virus. Chill the fuck out.
    6 points
  7. There is absolutely no reason to be worried. Ever, about anything, it's a daft thing to do. Worrying about something outside your control is bonkers. Worrying about something inside your control is you wasting time not doing the thing that would stop the worry.
    6 points
  8. Yep, I'll be 43 in July. No signs of stopping any time soon but in fairness, partying isn't exactly as it was for me, even five years ago. It's different but no less enjoyable. There are some events when I do feel slightly out of place, NASS last year for instance, I was definitely one of the oldest on site but it's never bothered me. Probably cos I still dress like an 18 year old! Love Saves The Day is another where I'm definitely not the target demographic but I'm comfortable when I'm there and right amongst it. I'm a semi-regular at Motion in Bristol and I try to get to at least two Warehouse Project events every season. Outside of festivals I probably go to between 8 or 9 club nights a year and that tends to be from September to April. Every year I try and get as many new electronica experiences in as possible while I still can, all over Europe, especially by myself. You're never too old. I love the fact that the music and the atmosphere gets me just as excited now as it did when I started out in 1993. Whilst you've got a smile on your face, a spring in your step and if you can still raise your arms in the air I say just keep dancing.
    5 points
  9. Hi everyone, Long time lurker first time poster here. This is a bit of an emotional story but here goes. I've been going to Glastonbury a few times over the last few years with my wife and her mother and father, who are in their 60s but are mad for music, and though they only went to their first Glasto in 2015, they enjoy and make the most of every moment. I'm talking watching headliners and then dancing the night away until 3 AM, waking up at the crack of dawn and doing it all over again. Absolute legends and put my wife and me (20s) to shame. Unfortunately, just after Christmas my father-in-law started feeling ill, and about a month ago was diagnosed with an aggressive stage 4 inoperable cancer. It's an absolutely heartbreaking thing to happen especially for someone who only 3 months ago was feeling great, going to the gym every day, having a drink at the weekend and loving life. In fact, we were only just at Glasto last year having a great time despite the abuse we all received from the sun! We all have secured tickets again this year and are determined to all go together this summer for the 50th anniversary, and are relatively sure this will be his last. We are trying to make this as special as possible for him, and I wondered if anyone had any tips or has experienced something similar or knows someone is a similar boat. Bonus points if you are/know a producer and could fix a meet-up with an artist, but I know that's a long shot. FWIW, we have already contacted Glasto Access team and have applied for accessibility and viewing platform passes for him and his wife. TL;DR father in law's last Glastonbury, trying to make it a good one. any tips/info/etc appreciated, we've also already contacted glasto access team. Thanks for reading and hopefully see some of you there!
    5 points
  10. @squirrelarmy - phone won’t allow me to quote and paste for some reason. 1 In China, where the disease originated, the epidemic seems to be in steep decline. At the peak of the crisis, four weeks ago, new infections were running at more than 3,000 a day. However, on Sunday, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO), just 46 new cases were confirmed — not far from the 43 cases in Britain. If the disease follows the same trend here, where the epidemic is running several weeks behind China, the panic could soon be over. 2 Globally, too, the number of new infections flattened at the weekend — with 3,735 new cases reported on Saturday, falling to 3,656 on Sunday, according to the WHO. This may, of course, turn out to be just a blip — a similarly modest fall was recorded the previous Sunday, so it might simply be down to fewer tests being performed at the weekend. If the fall is sustained, on the other hand, it could be a sign that the epidemic has peaked. Less good news is that new infections in Italy — the worst-affected European country — leapt from 778 on Saturday to 1,247 on Sunday. 3 We are approaching spring, when most viral infections tend to decline. According to the Chief Medical Officer, Professor Chris Whitty, there 'may be a seasonal element' to the coronavirus, just as there is to seasonal flu, which means transmission could well slow down over the coming weeks. Experiments have shown a dramatic fall in the length of time that a virus is able to survive outside the human body as the temperature rises. The flu season, for example, tends to be over by April. 4 We have had frequent scares about novel infectious diseases in recent years, and none of them has developed into a pandemic. Sars, which emerged in 2002, killed 774 people. In 2005, the WHO predicted that the H5N1 strain of avian flu could kill up to 50 million people worldwide, while Dr Dena Grayson, who helped develop the drugs to treat the deadly Ebola virus, has warned that with Covid-19, we could see a 'second wave' of cases 'similar to the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic'. In the event, H5N1 has killed 455 people. Covid-19 has already killed more than this — 3,584 up until the end of Sunday — but it is still a long way short of a pandemic. 5 Even if you are in close contact with someone who has — or who is incubating — the disease, there is still a good chance that you won't catch it. Health Secretary Matt Hancock last week said the Government was working on a worst-case scenario that up to 80 per cent of the UK population might catch the virus. However, in Hubei province, China — where the disease originated — only 20 per cent of the population is reported to have caught the disease. And a study by the Shenzhen Centre for Disease Control and Prevention suggests that only 7.9 per cent of adults who have been in close family contact with someone who has the disease will go on to catch it themselves. 6 Kids are even better off. For children under ten, the Chinese study found the infection rate to be slightly less — just 7.4 per cent. This is in spite of children having generally poorer personal hygiene than adults. Moreover, children were less likely to develop symptoms even if they were infected — suggesting that they have some degree of natural protection from the disease. This is in contrast to many viruses which have a habit of spreading quicker in schools than in other environments due to children's less developed immune systems. 7 The number of deaths globally is still tiny compared with the amount of people who annually succumb to seasonal flu. According to the U.S. Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, the annual global death toll from seasonal flu is between 291,000 and 646,000. Up until Sunday, by contrast, there had been 3,584 deaths worldwide from Covid-19. We don't notice this death toll from seasonal flu because many of the victims were already suffering from other medical conditions, and were liable to die at any time. The same is true of the coronavirus, where Chinese figures suggest that the death rate from Covid-19 rises tenfold in people suffering from cardiovascular diseases. This means that the majority of healthy people can expect to survive even if they catch the disease. 8 The claim that Covid-19 kills 3.4 per cent of those it infects is almost certainly a huge over-estimate. The figure came from the WHO last week, but — as the organisation was keen to stress — it had arrived at the number simply by dividing the number of reported deaths by the number of reported cases. This does not give a true figure for the mortality rate, because many mild cases of the virus, especially in the early stages of the outbreak, will have gone unrecorded. Zhejiang province, which has a population of 54 million (not much less than that of the UK), last week reported that it had recorded a grand total of 1,215 cases in the past three months with just one fatality. According to Professor Chris Whitty, the UK death rate is likely to be 1 per cent at most, and probably rather less. 9 As Covid-19 evolves it should become less virulent. The tendency of viruses to become less deadly — at least in the early years of a novel disease — was identified in experiments with the myxoma virus in rabbits in Australia in the Fifties. The virus was developed with the intention of controlling the rabbit population, and initially it killed almost every rabbit it infected within two weeks. However, within months the virus had evolved to kill between 50 per cent and 95 per cent of the rabbits it infected. There is a good evolutionary reason for this; it is not in the interests of a pathogen to kill its host animal. The most successful virus is one which spreads very easily but whose effect on the human body is hardly noticed. However, we will have to be eternally vigilant as the virus could mutate into a more deadly form 10 The FTSE 100 plunged nearly 8 per cent yesterday and share prices tumbled so fast on the New York Stock Exchange that they triggered a 'kill switch' that stops trading for a 15-minute cooling-off period. However, the good news is that while previous disease scares have caused big falls in stock markets, they haven't led to recessions (two successive quarters of negative growth). The Hong Kong flu pandemic in 1968-69 killed 1 million people. The Dow Jones index of U.S. shares slumped by 21 per cent at one point. But it didn't lead to a recession.
    5 points
  11. Imagine how much Glasto is gonna go off if we actually do make it there and it hasn't been cancelled.
    4 points
  12. I don’t post much on here but read a lot, and I have to say the state of this thread is concerning. This website is usually a lovely antidote to the outside world and whether it’s thread about the state of the ground, or the weather, I love the build up to glasto on here. Obviously, I am aware that we are in slightly uncharted territory generally speaking around the world at the moment, but the bickering and sharp responses on this thread are out of order. None of us know how the next few months will play out, and if there are dark days ahead globally, realistically I don’t think many of us will be too concerned about Glastonbury going ahead. I want to be in those fields come June as much as anyone, but that fact is we just don’t know if we will be or not at the moment. So, I guess this is just a plea for people to stop talking in absolutes and shooting people down. It’s hard enough to keep a level head at the moment without this forum exacerbating everyone’s fears and anxieties. stay cool ✌🏻
    4 points
  13. Today's update: (Note: Yesterday's update was late so a couple of countries may not have posted an update since yesterday around noon (Iran were the ones I noticed). All in all, yesterday was actually an encouraging day... In China, cases continue to fall, this time by 1,374 (17,532). In even more encouraging news, South Korea announced its first net decrease yesterday since their explosion of cases. They were down by 95 (7,212) and the optimist in me thinks this trend will continue as they have been slow at announcing recoveries until now. Elsewhere, it was just our usual gradual increases in East Asia. Singapore up 10 (82), Japan up 2 (420 - they also reduced the number of deaths attributed to the disease), Thailand up 1 (19), Vietnam up 1 (15), Philippines up 15 (33) and Brunei announced its first case (1). Hong Kong reduced by 1 (52) and the other countries remained the same. In the Middle East, we again had more encouraging news. Oman was down overall by 5 (9) and Bahrain announced 8 new recoveries (still up 6 though to 87). Kuwait only increased by 1 (64) and Iraq (up 7 to 61) and Saudi Arabia (up 4 to 19) announced their first recoveries. As mentioned, no new figures for Iran. In Africa, it was much of the same, small gradual increases or no change at all in all countries. Strangely Egypt seem to have unannounced 12 recoveries though. Burkina Faso (1) is our only new African country. In Europe, we saw Gibraltar reduce its cases to 0 which was good news. As expected, the larger countries saw large increases but we did see our first recoveries in some of these, such as Sweden, Norway and Iceland. Latvia also saw a reduction of 1 (5). In the UK, we didn't announce any recoveries yesterday so grew by 39 to 298. Nothing out of the ordinary there. Ireland grew by 3 to 24. Italy saw another massive jump of 1,598 to 7,985 but in better news, the original 11 towns they quarantined two weeks ago have all seen case numbers drop. Hopefully a sign of things to come. No sign of increases in Spain/Germany/France slowing down. Not much change in South America beyond expected gradual increases and further north we have Panama (1) as a new country. Mexico saw a few recoveries though so is down 3 (3). Canada's announced cases also fell (unsure why) so naturally they are down. USA has increased by 185 (721). In the rest of the world, Pakistan saw an increase of 10 (15). India saw it's first recovery in their second wave but still up 3 (43). Australia also grew, this time by 15 (66) but New Zealand remained at 5. Russia also grew by 3 (17) and Mongolia saw its first case (1).
    4 points
  14. Best of luck for your interview. The last one I was at I was asked if I could perform under pressure. I said no, but I Know all the words to Bohemian Rhapsody !
    4 points
  15. That’s because we have the mighty NHS looking after us and the US has an Orange Turnip to save them.
    3 points
  16. 3 points
  17. Oh please don't bring that in here. We have enough threads going around based on hypotheticals and fear.
    3 points
  18. From the Italian Facebook page: 5 AGOSTO Manni Dee I Hate Models Mella Dee Perc Slam SPFOAKS [SPFDJ & Héctor Oaks] 6 AGOSTO D.A.L.I. Francesco Del Garda Hamish & Toby Nicolas Lutz Sonja Moonear Robin Ordell 7 AGOSTO Boston 168 Live Chris Liebing Rødhåd Zioner 8 AGOSTO Echonomist Joris Voorn Kölsch Musumeci Patrice Bäumel Phunkadelica SHMLSS 9 AGOSTO Dixon Gerd Janson Honey Dijon Muallem 10 AGOSTO Eelke Kleijn La Fleur Matador Sasha 11 AGOSTO Anna Haleta DJ Stingray Dr. Rubinstein IMOGEN Willikens & Ivkovic
    3 points
  19. Sorry, i came across a bit snarky. I just find it odd that people that are saying they're 100% sure it's going ahead are the level headed ones and that people who are showing concern are doom mongering daily mail readers. You look around the world and there's now a lot of precedent for large gatherings being cancelled - not even just Coachella. There's no clear evidence that this will be done and dusted by June. Does anyone's opinion on this make any difference? No and fair play if you want to stay optimistic, but optimism isnt an argument.
    3 points
  20. Coachella is next month, and as posted extensively; is in a country with a healthcare system that’ll quite happily turn its back on those more vulnerable without insurance. At this moment in time, the UK has a worse problem with than the USA when you go by percentage of the population infected; yet we’ve got 250,000 people expected to go and cheer at horses in close proximity of one another the next few days. Emily and Michael have made such a show of the fiftieth that it’s only getting cancelled if they absolutely have to. Are the people spreading this negativity about it definitely being on the brink of cancellation, the same people who suggested the 50th would be the final ever festival? Can we please steer away from talking like the Daily Mail and not spread panic constantly. Anyway, back to the next announcement thread..
    3 points
  21. Only 15 people left to be destroyed before we get the poster.
    3 points
  22. No need for the WHO to bother headhunting or recruiting from fancy universities. Just need to dip in this thread and take their pick of expert epidemiologists.
    3 points
  23. Hi all, First post here (long time lurker), but really wanted to alert other people who may be in a similar situation. I had two motorhomes booked for Glastonbury through National Motorhomes. I originally made this booking as they had refundable deposits and didn't want to risk the amount of money and not get a campervan pass and in the reverse, I didn't want to pay for a campervan pass and risk not being able to get the motorhomes. In the end I booked with another company more local to me once my campervan pass was confirmed, but National Motorhomes had a 28 working day clause to turn around their deposit refunds. Chasing my deposit refund today (29 working days later), I received the following email... The companies house website confirms that Unbeatablehire LTD went into admin yesterday. I'm assuming National Motorhomes was a trading name for unbeatable hire. The National Motorhomes website is currently down. As far as I'm concerned, this was booked with a credit card so I will be fine getting my refund, but just really wanted to alert anyone who thought that they had a motorhome booked when this may not now be the case, or anyone who did similar to me with regards to deposit. I appreciate that administration is not the same as liquidation but this would concern me if I still had a booking intact rather than just waiting on a refund. Don't want anyone else getting caught out by this, especially if they have not been communicating this to their customers.
    2 points
  24. Utterly incredible facial expression and I love it, though to be honest I’ve replicated that face about an hour ago. Sadly not sexual, I stood barefooted on a piece of my grandsons Lego .
    2 points
  25. I think this sort of discussion intersects with social media and the impact it's had on our language use online – it's meant some people become a lot more straight down the line, opinions implied as facts, and there's less of a gray area in discourse or people willing to engage in a softer approach to chatting. It can come off as quite bullish sometimes, particularly when it covers politics or topical issues – I saw it a lot during the Br*xit mess last year. Anyway, I do hope the festival goes ahead as I had a great time last year and would love to be out in the sun with some beers watching the vast majority of these acts.
    2 points
  26. I’ve been having an argument with some of my friends who want the whole country locked down now and think it’s irresponsible that we aren’t doing anything. I’ve been trying to explain that despite us supposedly doing nothing, our daily increase in cases is fairly flat and much lower than the rate the worst hit countries have been increasing - despite them putting some pretty severe measures in place. The reality is our cases are going up at a rate roughly in between the best and the worst rates, and that’s with us doing very little. So with Glastonbury parked to one side, I’m inclined to agree with our governments approach so far. It seems daft to jump in now and out a load of lock down measures in place when things are a lot better here than many places that have put them in place. And it also appears that the advice of our top medical professionals that stopping sporting events won’t do a lot appears to be largely true as well.
    2 points
  27. Today’s Coronovirus thread update: 2 threads Dead 1 thread reanimated 1 thread under observation
    2 points
  28. Out of upvotes myself but if this post doesn’t get at least 500 upvotes we’ll have failed as both a forum and a nation. I’m here for the positivity.
    2 points
  29. As an accountant and auditor, I would assume that if the event was to get cancelled or postponed with the option of allowing people to hold their deposits to next year, there would be no tax implication due to the funds being related to an event in a completely different tax year. The funds won’t be chargeable for corporation tax purposes and would be classed as a liability on the balance sheet as deferred income with a disclosure requirement in line with post balance sheet events policy.
    2 points
  30. Good assumption: as a matter of fact it has been already leaked that Elrow will take place the first day and Claptone will perform there. On the other hand, we have Jon Hopkins + Floating Points and Jamie Jones B2B Capriati + Camelphat on the A38, and this is good!
    2 points
  31. You don't need to mansplain to me how to follow your logic. I get it. As I said I don't particularly want to continue this conversation so I am not going to.
    2 points
  32. Warning in regards to extended exposure to this thread.
    2 points
  33. Negative waves Moriarty, negative waves 😣
    2 points
  34. I’ve been saving this chart for the right time. We’re in that middle group of countries where it could still go either way.
    2 points
  35. So sorry for your loss but your story makes me realise why I love this festival of ours so much. It's a festival with a heart, that recognises that sometimes having the compassion to do everything to give a family those special memories is just a magical thing. Hope you and your family are coping well and so glad that you have those wonderful memories to look back on.
    2 points
  36. The irony being as soon as someone says something remotely negative then you jump in with this. Can't we just have a debate?
    2 points
  37. BBC breakfast, Deputy Chief Medical Officer : The Virus won't survive long outside, and outdoor events particularly are relatively safe.
    2 points
  38. If any of you fancy something to listen to on your commutes, training runs or gym trips - give this a go - my new podcast! Get to put a voice to the Efests handle! 😂 https://www.redbull.com/gb-en/projects/mark-beaumont-cycling-around-the-world-in-78-days-podcast
    2 points
  39. Gonna start panic buying APE tickets
    2 points
  40. I thought @deebeedoobee would be the compere. 😂
    1 point
  41. I think they would ... and Id hope under exceptional circumstances that there would be minimal negativity ( but Id fear different )
    1 point
  42. I don’t see how it’s possible to read the reports from Italian hospitals - which are pretty well equipped and staffed - and still think this is a ‘load of bollocks’.
    1 point
  43. Some people lap up the "journey" of an extended set and others need the variety. Like you, I'm in the latter camp. Especially when there's so much other interesting stuff on hand to enjoy. I do get it, though. I imagine a six hour set would work for me if it was a personal favourite with little else on in the other rooms. Has anyone on here really enjoyed an extended set? Arrived at the start and before they know it they've got lost and they're turning the lights on? Be interested to hear people's experiences, who are the best DJs for this kind of thing.
    1 point
  44. Baseline characteristics Confirmed cases; n (%) Deaths; n (%) Case fatality rate, % Overall 44,672 1,023 2.3% Age, years  0–9 416 (0.9%) − −  10–19 549 (1.2%) 1 (0.1%) 0.2%  20–29 3,619 (8.1%) 7 (0.7%) 0.2%  30–39 7,600 (17.0%) 18 (1.8%) 0.2%  40–49 8,571 (19.2%) 38 (3.7%) 0.4%  50–59 10,008 (22.4%) 130 (12.7%) 1.3%  60–69 8,583 (19.2%) 309 (30.2%) 3.6%  70–79 3,918 (8.8%) 312 (30.5%) 8.0%  ≥80 1,408 (3.2%) 208 (20.3%) 14.8% Sex  Male 22,981 (51.4%) 653 (63.8%) 2.8%  Female 21,691 (48.6%) 370 (36.2%) 1.7% Comorbid condition†  Hypertension 2,683 (12.8%) 161 (39.7%) 6.0%  Diabetes 1,102 (5.3%) 80 (19.7%) 7.3%  Cardiovascular disease 873 (4.2%) 92 (22.7%) 10.5%  Chronic respiratory disease 511 (2.4%) 32 (7.9%) 6.3%  Cancer (any) 107 (0.5%) 6 (1.5%) 5.6%  None 15,536 (74.0%) 133 (32.8%) 0.9%  Missing 23,690 (53.0%) 617 (60.3%) 2.6% Case severity§  Mild 36,160 (80.9%) − −  Severe 6,168 (13.8%) − −  Critical 2,087 (4.7%) 1,023 (100%) 49.0%  Missing 257 (0.6%) − − Period (by date of onset)  Before Dec 31, 2019 104 (0.2%) 15 (1.5%) 14.4%  Jan 1–10, 2020 653 (1.5%) 102 (10.0%) 15.6%  Jan 11–20, 2020 5,417 (12.1%) 310 (30.3%) 5.7%  Jan 21–31, 2020 26,468 (59.2%) 494 (48.3%) 1.9%  After Feb 1, 2020 12,030 (26.9%) 102 (10.0%) 0.8% Table 2. Patients, deaths, and case fatality rates, as well as observed time and mortality for n=44,672 confirmed COVID-19 cases in Mainland China as of February 11, 2020. Modified from http://weekly.chinacdc.cn/news/TrackingtheEpidemic.htm. It's a bit old now but detailed.
    1 point
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