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Time to throw the towel in?


JoeyT
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6 hours ago, The Nal said:

Yeah I was on the coach this year too but think there were still big queues even for the coaches

Can anyone confirm?

I arrived on a See Tickets coach on Weds at 9.45am and it took until 11.15am to get through.

Mate of mine got a later See Tickets coach arrived at 6pm and walked straight in.

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Felt like throwing the towel after 2019, the heat and my stressed situation at the time definitely contributed to it.  This year I was much more prepared, felt very fit going into the festival and knew I had to hydrate properly and wear a hat on the hot days.  Safe to say this years festival restored my love for it.  I will be trying for tickets in October, although I didn't get a good response from Mrs P last night when I said that, her 5 days at home with the Mini P's has worn her out so I seriously need to be racking up the brownie points for the next few months!

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40 years since me & my mate first went, we are both 60 now & despite all the aches & pains we both plan to continue for the foreseeable future. We still talk about the years we have missed (kids etc) You always regret the ones you miss. Keep going as long as you can. Its truly special to be able to go, it should never be taken for granted.

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9 minutes ago, Giraffe Man said:

40 years since me & my mate first went, we are both 60 now & despite all the aches & pains we both plan to continue for the foreseeable future. We still talk about the years we have missed (kids etc) You always regret the ones you miss. Keep going as long as you can. Its truly special to be able to go, it should never be taken for granted.

my-man-my-man-denzel.gif

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I seem to be older than those who have admitted their age on this thread - I'll be 70 before the end of the year. But I didn't really have any problems with exhaustion at all. Yes, I'm a bit tired today but nothing out of the normal.

BUT, this being my 13th festival since 2005 (but I did go to the Bath Festival of Blues & Progressive Music in 1970 which started it all), I have always volunteered with WaterAid. The experience in the first years wasn't much different to the regular punters, camping in crowded conditions in the centre of the site with no "perks".

For the last few years we have camped in Brimley's Orchard next to the recyclers in Tom's Field. We now have our own compost toilets in the field and even better toilets a short walk away, plenty of decent showers and a canteen with some free meal tickets and subsidised food and a crew bar with probably the best ale on the site, combined with it being the cheapest - £3.50 a pint. Talking to a couple in Worthy View it seems to be similar in facilities but with smaller queues and only a modest slope to climb up every night.

We obviously have to work, 4 x 6 hour shifts over 5 days with a day off. But even with the short straw rota with a day off on Thursday and 6pm to midnight shifts on both Friday and Sunday we still had a great time. Working is almost as much a highlight as the rest of the delights - meeting a huge cross section of festival goers. I saw a grand total of 9 acts over 4 days and only 5 on the "main" stages and some of them only a part set. But we had all sorts of other interactions, met and drank with a lot of friends.

Maybe if I get another 2007 I might be tempted to call it a day but as long as my health holds up I'll be back. But volunteering - hugely enjoyable, a free ticket, no angst getting a ticket and a Tuesday arrival so no traffic or queues. Tuesday is one of my favourite days, seeing all the green fields but plenty of bars open and lots of friends there.

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It’s really weird reading this thread this year because much of what is being said - about no longer needing to go EVERY year, going in later, doing things a bit differently - is exactly where me and Mr Amfy hit in about 2013.

You’ll be pleased to know we’ve done all but 2 since then!

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Pretty much every year I've been since 2005 I've seen less music. This year I hit a new record low, admittedly partly because many of the acts I wanted to see I was working for. But less has been more for me for years now.

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7 hours ago, DeanoL said:

The irony is, the less interested you are in the main stages, the harder to replicate the experience elsewhere gets, and the more special Glastonbury gets. I don't know another single festival in the world where you can go watch a show by a world-class circus group, then go see a headline-level comedian. That alone isn't replicated elsewhere, nevermind following that up with McCartney.

I've got the opposite "problem" (and I realise this sounds horrendously selfish and entitled) but I acknowledged a few festivals back that was no longer necessary for me to go every year. But I *know" I'm not going to get tickets every year. We've got tickets every year in the main sale, with no shenanigans, just the usual having everyone in the group trying on ticket day (and some years having two groups with an agreement to try for each other). Never had to do a resale for myself. And I wouldn't at this point: if I miss out, I miss out.

That's an extraordinary amount of luck and I'm hugely privileged to have had things go that way for me, but it's making me very aware that I can't just say "well I won't go next year but I'll do 2024" - we don't get to choose. I'd maybe like to do one in every three festivals (health permitting) but it's probably a 1 in 3 chance of getting tickets at this point in the main sale. So that means trying every year and going when the ticket gods let you.

Yeah fair enough. That's actually kind of my situation really: I try ever year and three times I didn't get tickets in the main sale. First of those I got a ticket in the resale and second two I decided not to bother. I think there will come a point when most people don't get lucky in the main sale and have to make that decision but for some people it seems to take a lot longer!

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51 minutes ago, JohnEW said:

I seem to be older than those who have admitted their age on this thread - I'll be 70 before the end of the year. But I didn't really have any problems with exhaustion at all. Yes, I'm a bit tired today but nothing out of the normal.

BUT, this being my 13th festival since 2005 (but I did go to the Bath Festival of Blues & Progressive Music in 1970 which started it all), I have always volunteered with WaterAid. The experience in the first years wasn't much different to the regular punters, camping in crowded conditions in the centre of the site with no "perks".

For the last few years we have camped in Brimley's Orchard next to the recyclers in Tom's Field. We now have our own compost toilets in the field and even better toilets a short walk away, plenty of decent showers and a canteen with some free meal tickets and subsidised food and a crew bar with probably the best ale on the site, combined with it being the cheapest - £3.50 a pint. Talking to a couple in Worthy View it seems to be similar in facilities but with smaller queues and only a modest slope to climb up every night.

We obviously have to work, 4 x 6 hour shifts over 5 days with a day off. But even with the short straw rota with a day off on Thursday and 6pm to midnight shifts on both Friday and Sunday we still had a great time. Working is almost as much a highlight as the rest of the delights - meeting a huge cross section of festival goers. I saw a grand total of 9 acts over 4 days and only 5 on the "main" stages and some of them only a part set. But we had all sorts of other interactions, met and drank with a lot of friends.

Maybe if I get another 2007 I might be tempted to call it a day but as long as my health holds up I'll be back. But volunteering - hugely enjoyable, a free ticket, no angst getting a ticket and a Tuesday arrival so no traffic or queues. Tuesday is one of my favourite days, seeing all the green fields but plenty of bars open and lots of friends there.

You're an inspiration to us all

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2 hours ago, Chip Batch said:

Not so much thinking of not going, but also considering a Thursday arrival and skip all the queues and to be more on form for the Friday. Anyone who arrives on Thursday - where do you camp? Everywere seems rammed by Wednesday evening.

I'm off to End of the Road again later in the year. It's a really nice festival without the crazy crowds and walking like at Glastonbury. And you can take your own booze into the 'arena'

 

I arrive Wednesday but opt to camp in Bushy these days and there's still a decent amount of space by Thursday. I think Pylon will too. It's a long walk to the SE corner but I like it there because it's quiet at night and there's usually a fair bit of space. In past years loos have been good (didn't go this year) and it's very handy for the coach park but don't know about car parks. I could never sleep properly when we camped in Park Home so having somewhere I can sleep has been a revelation.

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1 hour ago, JohnEW said:

I seem to be older than those who have admitted their age on this thread - I'll be 70 before the end of the year. But I didn't really have any problems with exhaustion at all. Yes, I'm a bit tired today but nothing out of the normal.

BUT, this being my 13th festival since 2005 (but I did go to the Bath Festival of Blues & Progressive Music in 1970 which started it all), I have always volunteered with WaterAid. The experience in the first years wasn't much different to the regular punters, camping in crowded conditions in the centre of the site with no "perks".

For the last few years we have camped in Brimley's Orchard next to the recyclers in Tom's Field. We now have our own compost toilets in the field and even better toilets a short walk away, plenty of decent showers and a canteen with some free meal tickets and subsidised food and a crew bar with probably the best ale on the site, combined with it being the cheapest - £3.50 a pint. Talking to a couple in Worthy View it seems to be similar in facilities but with smaller queues and only a modest slope to climb up every night.

We obviously have to work, 4 x 6 hour shifts over 5 days with a day off. But even with the short straw rota with a day off on Thursday and 6pm to midnight shifts on both Friday and Sunday we still had a great time. Working is almost as much a highlight as the rest of the delights - meeting a huge cross section of festival goers. I saw a grand total of 9 acts over 4 days and only 5 on the "main" stages and some of them only a part set. But we had all sorts of other interactions, met and drank with a lot of friends.

Maybe if I get another 2007 I might be tempted to call it a day but as long as my health holds up I'll be back. But volunteering - hugely enjoyable, a free ticket, no angst getting a ticket and a Tuesday arrival so no traffic or queues. Tuesday is one of my favourite days, seeing all the green fields but plenty of bars open and lots of friends there.

I'm a bit younger at 52 but agree with all of this. Toms bar is insanely cheap and the ale range is fantastic.

I did see a lot more bands than you but it's just what I enjoy doing.

The shifts mean you always have to make some compromises but I didn't miss much that I wanted to see

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I think I saw more music but less "other things" than in previous years.  I only went to Theatre fields for about an hour, didn't go to cabaret or circus (just watched a bit of the outside circus once) or much of the Greenfields.  I feel a bit sad about that - I didn't really see the quirky side of the festival as much.  I also didn't really do much after the headliners this year either.  I was camped in Darble and so because I was in JP for Primal Scream on Friday, I took the easy option of just going back to the tent (though I would have gone to Fromage if I'd remembered it was on).  Similarly on Saturday after Macca - wasn't sure I could be bothered to see if I could find something I would enjoy on my own (I had planned to go to Doreen Doreen when I thought Macca would finish at 11.45) but did go to that on Sunday instead which was great fun.  

I think at the back of my mind I was very much aware that I was three years older than in 2019 - I know everyone obviously is but hitting the big 60 last year, I was worried I may not be able to stand the pace so I think I was pacing myself and maybe overdid the not tiring myself out.  That said on Wednesday and Thursday I did find the heat a little much but took myself to Strummerville and enjoying a place on the sofa for a few hours chatting to strangers and drinking beer.

So, yes I plan to be back and maybe make a conscious decision to do more of the "other things" and more later night stuff.  Which is easier if you have no "must sees" and can dip out if need be.

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5 hours ago, Chip Batch said:

Not so much thinking of not going, but also considering a Thursday arrival and skip all the queues and to be more on form for the Friday. Anyone who arrives on Thursday - where do you camp? Everywere seems rammed by Wednesday evening.

I'm off to End of the Road again later in the year. It's a really nice festival without the crazy crowds and walking like at Glastonbury. And you can take your own booze into the 'arena'

 

Can’t speak for 19 & 22 as I didn’t get tickets but turned up on Thursday afternoon in 2017 flying solo so I had very  a small 2 man tent and pretty easily found room to squeeze it in in a premium spot in pennards. But could have done the same in almost any field 

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3 hours ago, JohnEW said:

I seem to be older than those who have admitted their age on this thread - I'll be 70 before the end of the year. But I didn't really have any problems with exhaustion at all. Yes, I'm a bit tired today but nothing out of the normal.

BUT, this being my 13th festival since 2005 (but I did go to the Bath Festival of Blues & Progressive Music in 1970 which started it all), I have always volunteered with WaterAid. The experience in the first years wasn't much different to the regular punters, camping in crowded conditions in the centre of the site with no "perks".

 

I too was at Bath.  I'm 72. and I coped OK with the walking but my biggest problem this year was feeling cold at night.  I think I need to review my thermal gear. At least I had the consolation of a carvan to go back to in East 24 to warm up with a mug of drinking chocolate (life in the fast lane!)

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33 minutes ago, grumpyhack said:

I too was at Bath.  I'm 72. and I coped OK with the walking but my biggest problem this year was feeling cold at night.  I think I need to review my thermal gear. At least I had the consolation of a carvan to go back to in East 24 to warm up with a mug of drinking chocolate (life in the fast lane!)

Yeah, I was cold on Friday-Sunday nights, which didn't help my feeling run down through the festival as it caused a little trouble sleeping. I had a basic air mattress with fleece blankets on top followed by a 350gsm sleeping bag. I thought that would be plenty, but apparently not.

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49 minutes ago, grumpyhack said:

I too was at Bath.  I'm 72. and I coped OK with the walking but my biggest problem this year was feeling cold at night.  I think I need to review my thermal gear. At least I had the consolation of a carvan to go back to in East 24 to warm up with a mug of drinking chocolate (life in the fast lane!)

I know they are expensive compared to other options but seriously consider buying a down sleeping bag. Truly game changing.

If you purchase one the other tip is to take as much of as possible before getting in the bag. It's a misconception that putting on more layers will keep you warmer.

A down bag works by capturing your body heat in the feathers. I had dragon breath at my tent when going to bed on a couple of mornings. Five mins later... Toasty warm in maggot.

I think ethical options are also available if you don't like the idea of duck down.

The ONLY negative is sometimes waking up with mini feathers in random places.

These are who I went to. They are available at UK Stockists 

https://www.hykeandbyke.com

Edited by Jay Pee
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On 6/27/2022 at 7:09 PM, admscott said:

This festival absolutely broke me physically, mentally, and spiritually. Loved all of the acts I saw and the highs were incredibly high. The lows, though... oh boy. 

It was beyond crowded, but this was my first time going properly solo. Did not enjoy it. Really missed the social aspect of it, but that coupled with the fact that everyone who said they would hang out with me either stood me up or cancelled made me feel quite isolated and caused a lot of self-doubt. The friends I used to go with have all moved on from wanting to go regularly. I think if I don't have someone to go with, I won't go again. 

Also, my legs are fucked haha! 

Maybe I need to work on both my mental and physical fortitude - but right now the thought of another Glasto just makes me feel sad and worried. I've never had that before. 

First of all, hoping you’re feeling better by now. Judging by the honesty you’ve shown writing this post, i think you’re a decent person, and fully deserve better.

 

I think it’s totally natural that you’d feel miserable after being stood up etc, horrible behaviour of others. But please try not to ‘self-doubt’, and hope you knkw it isn’t your fault. I did a solo one this year, and I understand and sympathize with what you wrote down.

 

In general, if it’a not a decision that’s urgent, I would hold off on deciding wether it’s ‘my last’ or not. I was certainly tempted to say ‘it’s my last’ after this one (and during many moments), but I am going to see how i feel, and i hope you do too. It will help uou make a more “informed” decision, and not feel bad about yourself.

 

For what it’s worth, I wouldn’t have stood you up! Again, hope u feel better

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My wife and I have spent the past few years trying to use the more environmentally-conscious approach of using public transport to get on site.

It works fine practically, but us two 40-somethings did feel rather out of place this year sharing a coach with a bunch of kids. 

It’s the first time we’ve both said ‘are we a bit old for this?’. That feeling disappears the minute you’re on site in the ticket queue - but it gave us pause for thought at the time - whilst we noshed our bus-trip breakfast, looking out as the mist lifting over the mendips whilst they mostly stared down at their phones, there was a bigger gap there than I’ve felt before. 

We won’t give up trying to go anytime soon - maybe you just need those odd little moments to be sure you’re doing something you love for the right reasons.

 

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32 minutes ago, CaledonianGonzo said:

I always leave a fleece, socks and a wooly hat by my sleeping bag to clamber into if its baltic. Didn't need them this year but they were there if I did.

Same deal.  Only realised I'd forgotten my wooly hat on Wednesday night and I'd shaved my bonce before the festival, my self defeating air mattress finally died a death and I was still able to be comfortable at night somehow.   I can't sleep in socks, no matter how cold, those poor bastards need some time to breathe.

I felt the cold saturday night but I'd been more sensible with adding layers on other nights.  Sunday it was blazing when you were in the sunlight but actually quite chilly in the shade.  By that point in the festival I was about done with being in the direct sun constantly and a lot of my entertainment involved food, liquid and shade.  Zero regrets.

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15 hours ago, stopwn1981 said:

I must have been at a different festival all this talk of more people and awful crowding. You just have to play it smart when moving and where. I only got caught in one crush all weekend which was out of PSB as loads coming into other to get to Arcadia. It didn’t feel overly more crowded that usual to me at least. 

Yes I asked my other half yesterday who confirmed my feeling, which is the same as yours.

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16 hours ago, gooner1990 said:

I arrived on a See Tickets coach on Weds at 9.45am and it took until 11.15am to get through.

Mate of mine got a later See Tickets coach arrived at 6pm and walked straight in.

Took the See from London 12PM. I think we arrived around 4:30/5PM and no queue at all.

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I totally get why some people are considering their future at the festival. After 2007 and the apocalyptic conditions, I decided to pack it in after 11 years going hammer and tongs at it every year. But after a few years break and going to festivals abroad, I went back and have been going again ever since. It's the best decision I could've made. 

Taking a break for a year or two will reinvigorate you and the hunger will return. Sure, you may have to change your routine as the years take their toll on your body but don't write it off completely unless you've had a really bad experience.

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