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yehbutnobut
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Would love to get a few perspectives from people...

Glastonbury in our household tends to be the time Mummy & Daddy get to go away for the week and really let their hair down together, which obviously is a well needed form of therapy. But as the years go by, there is a feeling from me at least that in the next few years we'll need to think about taking the kids, not only because we might not be able to get cover anymore, but more for the fact that I feel the festival would be a great experience for their little developing brains, give them some real diverse exposure to all sorts of wonderful things, and would be something a little different to the norm to put it mildly.

Obviously if that were the case, then it would turn the fest into a totally different animal for us. But i'm really interested to hear if anyone else has done both with & without their children, and how this changed the experience... OR, whether i'm bark raving mad and should just keep it to play time for the parents!?

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45 minutes ago, yehbutnobut said:

Would love to get a few perspectives from people...

Glastonbury in our household tends to be the time Mummy & Daddy get to go away for the week and really let their hair down together, which obviously is a well needed form of therapy. But as the years go by, there is a feeling from me at least that in the next few years we'll need to think about taking the kids, not only because we might not be able to get cover anymore, but more for the fact that I feel the festival would be a great experience for their little developing brains, give them some real diverse exposure to all sorts of wonderful things, and would be something a little different to the norm to put it mildly.

Obviously if that were the case, then it would turn the fest into a totally different animal for us. But i'm really interested to hear if anyone else has done both with & without their children, and how this changed the experience... OR, whether i'm bark raving mad and should just keep it to play time for the parents!?

Mini-Blutarsky is only 18 months, so the following all comes with that caveat, but...

We took her to Beautiful Days last summer and it was obviously a totally different animal. We missed a lot because we were looking after her and entertaining her. We weren't that bothered, as it's a small festival and there's a lot less to miss than at Glastonbury. We also recognise that given she was 10 months old she needed a lot more care than she will as she gets older. 

We also took her to camp at Worthy Pastures and that confirmed that we wanted to keep the G as Mum and Dad's party getaway. Getting around the site was a lot tougher, and getting out and about required a lot of prep. No just upping and going - planning required at all times. 

I'm of the view I'd take her when she gets towards 10, so we can get her in on a free ticket at least once or twice. I'd say we'll take her when she's 10 and 11, but if there's a fallow year, maybe from age 9. 

Particularly when she's really young, I think it's important kids keep a routine around bedtime etc, and I don't fancy being at Glastonbury and having to turn in at 9pm! 

Having said that, I think it was Russel Kane who was on the Parenting Hell podcast ages ago and said he did Glastonbury with kids and friends in similar positions. He said they'd take it in turns to share childcare, so perhaps the Dad's are out one night while the Mum's are in, and vice versa, then each couple had a night in together and a night out. That sounds a good compromise. 

My parents are also Glastonbury goers but at their age they generally turn in not long after the headliners, so if they were there to share childcare we'd be more likely to take Mini-B at a younger age. 

Edited by blutarsky
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We've been with a 6 and 8 year old. It's a very different experience, but a rewarding one. I had never been in the Kidz Field before but was amazed by how good it was. Some of the entertainment was brilliant and the vibe amazing. The kids came to see some acts but we were generally back at the tent by around 9pm. I went off for a later one with a mate one evening whilst the other half stayed at the tent. 

We stayed at Wickets, which was awesome. 

I did so much queuing though. SO BLOODY MUCH! 

We're not taking them this time - but have done dozens and dozens of festivals with them over the years: Bluedot and Shambala are favourites. 

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Seriously considering taking the Minor Jasses next year who will be 5 and 3 next festival.

I'm anticipating lots of flitting between the Kids and Pyramid fields. I certainly can't envisage moving between stages much. Probably just a case of hoping for a decent run on El Pointo and bedding down for the day.

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16 minutes ago, Hugh Jass II said:

Seriously considering taking the Minor Jasses next year who will be 5 and 3 next festival.

I'm anticipating lots of flitting between the Kids and Pyramid fields. I certainly can't envisage moving between stages much. Probably just a case of hoping for a decent run on El Pointo and bedding down for the day.

We hit different areas on different days. Did Pyramid/Other on the Friday and then the Park on the Saturday. 

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I don’t see any point, obviously unless you have to, in taking young kids until they’re old enough to appreciate and enjoy it. Otherwise it’s just a bind, and would certainly impact on your enjoyment of the festival massively.

 

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3 hours ago, yehbutnobut said:

Would love to get a few perspectives from people...

Glastonbury in our household tends to be the time Mummy & Daddy get to go away for the week and really let their hair down together, which obviously is a well needed form of therapy. But as the years go by, there is a feeling from me at least that in the next few years we'll need to think about taking the kids, not only because we might not be able to get cover anymore, but more for the fact that I feel the festival would be a great experience for their little developing brains, give them some real diverse exposure to all sorts of wonderful things, and would be something a little different to the norm to put it mildly.

Obviously if that were the case, then it would turn the fest into a totally different animal for us. But i'm really interested to hear if anyone else has done both with & without their children, and how this changed the experience... OR, whether i'm bark raving mad and should just keep it to play time for the parents!?

Similar situation, mine will be 8 and 5 by the time this year's comes around but so far I've not wanted to give up the freedom. Husband 'retired from Glastonbury' in 2013 which meant I was able to go with friends in 2016/19 and I enjoyed my selfish solo fun SO MUCH. I did notice/ chat to lots of young families and although I would love to have the boys there for a few hours in the kids field (wishful thinking!) overall I'm happy we didn't try to take them very young - the mud in '16 and sun in '19 would have been a killer.

We did Camp Bestival last year which went well, very different vibe, but again made me think we've been right to hold off from the big G, as even with a much smaller site and a trolley to push them in, there were several meltdowns and the usual frustrations from tired/ overstimulated children. Looking at maybe Blue Dot this year or a day festival.

I'll see how I feel after this year - if they start asking and if the other half can be persuaded to join us then maaaaybe I'd consider taking them... maybe. Ideally we'd get friends with kids to go together in a couple of years and share childcare. No way in hell I'd take them on my own!

 

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46 minutes ago, henry bear said:

I don’t see any point, obviously unless you have to, in taking young kids until they’re old enough to appreciate and enjoy it. Otherwise it’s just a bind, and would certainly impact on your enjoyment of the festival massively.

 

I’ve taken my kids from 4-17 and they were able to appreciate it from the beginning and more fully at the end. Hedonistic activities have to be planned/negotiated. It is fantastic seeing your children experiencing things for the first time (thankfully not my son’s first pill).

 

I’ve also done the festival with mates and solo and had fantastic times. It’s a different festival with children I would say not better or worse just different. 
 

it might be a bigger difference with the modern festival- the first time we took the children there was no naughty corner chilling around a camp fire by your tent was the norm so could still be done

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1 hour ago, henry bear said:

I don’t see any point, obviously unless you have to, in taking young kids until they’re old enough to appreciate and enjoy it. Otherwise it’s just a bind, and would certainly impact on your enjoyment of the festival massively.

 

Ours absolutely love festivals - and have done ever since they were nippers. It's super exciting for them. 

 

It can absolutely be a bind though. 

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I was a late starter with the festival scene, mainly because my boy was my graduation present from University. First two years (02,03), I went with mates, but frankly they were a little boring in the second year so hatched a plan for it to be family time in 2004.

My boy was now 9 and we took his slightly younger cousin for company. We had a ball. However, it did mean some compromises but it also led to a love affair with the Theatre and Circus fields that is still going strong. As previous posters have stated the Kids field is awesome. Took them back in 2005, where they scared the life out of us on the way down, talking about all of the places they were going to eat. They were planning 5 meals a day! Still the most I've ever spent at a Glastonbury! I must have spent £50 on churros alone.

After the fallow year, he took his best mate for years 07 and 08. These were probably the hardest as  they wanted more independence, but we were caring for someone else's child. It was also in 2007 that I persuaded my best mate and his wife to join us, who instantly fell in love with the festival. Since then it has been adults only, except after his GCSE's when we was allowed to come with his mates so long as they camped in the same field as us.

It's definitely worth it in those years when you don't have to pay for them!

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16 minutes ago, Boomtowner said:

Took them back in 2005, where they scared the life out of us on the way down, talking about all of the places they were going to eat. They were planning 5 meals a day! Still the most I've ever spent at a Glastonbury! I must have spent £50 on churros alone.

 

Haha, What is it with kids, festivals and churros?! 

I've often said to friends thinking of taking theirs. You'll have an absolute ball - especially if you're happy to listen to the bands whilst in queues for ice creams or face painting!

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22 minutes ago, Boomtowner said:

I was a late starter with the festival scene, mainly because my boy was my graduation present from University. First two years (02,03), I went with mates, but frankly they were a little boring in the second year so hatched a plan for it to be family time in 2004.

My boy was now 9 and we took his slightly younger cousin for company. We had a ball. However, it did mean some compromises but it also led to a love affair with the Theatre and Circus fields that is still going strong. As previous posters have stated the Kids field is awesome. Took them back in 2005, where they scared the life out of us on the way down, talking about all of the places they were going to eat. They were planning 5 meals a day! Still the most I've ever spent at a Glastonbury! I must have spent £50 on churros alone.

After the fallow year, he took his best mate for years 07 and 08. These were probably the hardest as  they wanted more independence, but we were caring for someone else's child. It was also in 2007 that I persuaded my best mate and his wife to join us, who instantly fell in love with the festival. Since then it has been adults only, except after his GCSE's when we was allowed to come with his mates so long as they camped in the same field as us.

It's definitely worth it in those years when you don't have to pay for them!

You banned your son from going?! 😮 

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1 minute ago, gooner1990 said:

You banned your son from going?! 😮 

There were a number of factors in play,

One, he became Kevin the Teenager and didn't want to go anywhere with his parents! 

Two, it also became a lot more difficult to get tickets 

Finally, and most importantly, it is more fun without the children 😉

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10 minutes ago, David_303 said:

Haha, What is it with kids, festivals and churros?! 

I've often said to friends thinking of taking theirs. You'll have an absolute ball - especially if you're happy to listen to the bands whilst in queues for ice creams or face painting!

I'm a little bit scared as we're taking the grandkids to Bearded in May and I can see that happening. It'll be a small fortune on food!

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21 minutes ago, Boomtowner said:

I'm a little bit scared as we're taking the grandkids to Bearded in May and I can see that happening. It'll be a small fortune on food!

I make batches of stuff at home, freeze it up (using to keep beer cool in a coolbox) and *still* spend a fortune every bloody time!

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  • 2 months later...
On 3/22/2022 at 3:57 PM, Boomtowner said:

I was a late starter with the festival scene, mainly because my boy was my graduation present from University. First two years (02,03), I went with mates, but frankly they were a little boring in the second year so hatched a plan for it to be family time in 2004.

My boy was now 9 and we took his slightly younger cousin for company. We had a ball. However, it did mean some compromises but it also led to a love affair with the Theatre and Circus fields that is still going strong. As previous posters have stated the Kids field is awesome. Took them back in 2005, where they scared the life out of us on the way down, talking about all of the places they were going to eat. They were planning 5 meals a day! Still the most I've ever spent at a Glastonbury! I must have spent £50 on churros alone.

After the fallow year, he took his best mate for years 07 and 08. These were probably the hardest as  they wanted more independence, but we were caring for someone else's child. It was also in 2007 that I persuaded my best mate and his wife to join us, who instantly fell in love with the festival. Since then it has been adults only, except after his GCSE's when we was allowed to come with his mates so long as they camped in the same field as us.

It's definitely worth it in those years when you don't have to pay for them!

Quite often when raising children who are 5-8 years old, I think about what to expect in the future. This is especially true for boys and further military training for them. On the site https://writingbros.com/essay-examples/jrotc/ I read quite useful information about jrotc and decided to give my guys a summer camp that will prepare them physically.

Thank you for sharing your experience

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My friend is going this year with her 3.5 year old. She is well aware it will be a very different experience. She has talked about doing every other festival with her daughter so that one year she gets to do old style Glastonbury and then the next year her daughter gets to fall in love with the festival as well and she gets the joy of seeing it happen. It also means a little less squabbling with schools for the time off. I think that's a pretty good compromise. Obviously can't guarantee getting tickets every year. I also think the older they get, the more they are interested in the music as well. 

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I’ve taken my 2 oldest girls from the ages of 3 and 5 ( oldest is 14 this year) and we literally had the best time… oldest daughter has been up on stage with dynamo twice and basil brush twice in the kidz field.

youngest daughter we took at 6 weeks old but only for the Sunday and  I did find that a bit stressful, but had an amazing time with the older ones. I would definitely recommend taking children.

This year will be the first time without the kids as we are volunteering and I’m not sure how I feel about it, looking forward to having some more adult time but I’ll most definitely miss the kidz field.

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My boys are now 8 and 10. Every year we think about taking them but we just don't think they have the physical stamina for it yet.  We have taken them to latitude a few times and they can get quite annoying when they are tired. You definitely have to be prepared to work your plans around what they want to do... but then that is life with kids. 

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If they aren't school age take them - if they are school age they should be in school not pretending to have a "education" in a muddy field.

I regret not taking mine when they where young enough.

Edited by Barry Fish
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I have never taken my children (currently 10 and 4) other than to Worthy Pastures last year! 

BUT...we are letting the 10 year old to come on the Sunday this year. Collecting her from Bath and West early and she is going to stay the night and come back in the morning. I'm excited to have her there.. She will love it! But I'm not ready to give her the whole festival yet! 

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