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LAWKS! It’s the Next Announcement Thread 2022!


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2 hours ago, Matt42 said:

Let’s be real. I’m going to hit a point at some stage where I look at the glasto lineup and I’m like “who the fuck are all these people”.

It happens to everyone. It SHOULD happen to everyone. I’m at a stage where quite a lot of the bookings are geared toward my age group but it shouldn’t like that forever.

I’m perfectly happy to be “out of touch” with what is cool to book in 10 years time. Won’t stop be going though (ha ha)

I am on the cusp of this being me. 80% of what's been booked on the Pyramid so far is not for me. But it's not aimed at me. And I'm completely comfortable with that. 

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5 hours ago, dentalplan said:

Pop music hardly got bigger or better, but it did gain more credibility over the years as the taste-making publications and brands had to go online and rely on clicks and likes rather than a sheer following. Similarly, rock music hardly got worse or less popular, it's just that the festival is booking for a more populist audience now than the in-market festival fans it used to.

 

I think this is demonstrably wrong by looking at any relevant metrics.

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40 minutes ago, tarw said:

I have just turned 60 and every year I don’t know half of the acts on the poster. I just listen to @Brave Sir Robin’s playlist and I discover lots of new music.
My tastes have changed over the years but I still find more than enough to sate me at glastonbury. 
 

To me there is a much more diverse and better quality of music now than when I was younger. 
 

I don’t think you will get out of touch with 

music because you obviously love it so much, but maybe you’ll mellow a bit and not be so dogmatic 

I could have written this post (except I don't think I've ever knowingly used the word domgmatic).  I have never been at the cutting edge but I never have found a problem finding people to see (thanks to Brave Sir Robin's playlist of course).  Hell, if I did, there's always Theatre, Cabaret, Circus, general bimbling, etc etc.  

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2 hours ago, Leyrulion said:

That's really interesting, goes to show that these things come and go with time. Maybe by 2032 Glastonbury ticket sales will be easier, we can only dream!

Likewise T in the park used to sell out rapid in the mid to late 2000s. Then it died in 2016 and is no more. Glastonbury is obv a different beast tho but it’s mad how quick things can change 

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Yeah I couldn't believe the decline of V Festival from the early 2000s when they had great headliners, Foos, Radiohead, Oasis - to becoming very pop orientated and resorting to buy one get one free tickets just a few years later (so it wasn't just not to my taste but not to anyone's taste).

Although it had its faults (many of which I wasn't aware of at the time as I hadn't been to any other festival), it was a shame how it declined. Locally it was a rite of passage for teenagers to go after A levels, and sometimes GCSEs.

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23 minutes ago, fraybentos1 said:

Likewise T in the park used to sell out rapid in the mid to late 2000s. Then it died in 2016 and is no more. Glastonbury is obv a different beast tho but it’s mad how quick things can change 

If T had been able to stay at Balado it would still be going.

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4 minutes ago, Freddyflintstonree said:

V Fest I've always been shocked at. I've had quite a few people over the years ask when the next one is. What even happened to it? 

I'm not sure really.  I've looked back at the headliners they had and actually they aren't as bad as I thought, not my taste but big names on the whole headlining, but I don't recognise many of the names further down the lineup so maybe all their money went on the big names?

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15 minutes ago, fraybentos1 said:

Likewise T in the park used to sell out rapid in the mid to late 2000s. Then it died in 2016 and is no more. Glastonbury is obv a different beast tho but it’s mad how quick things can change 

T in the Park is an interesting one, sold out on the day for several years until 2012 when the lineup was a clear downgrade on the previous years. Once they lost the hype of tickets selling out quickly they never really recovered and between that and the progressive downsizing of everything over the next few years, it was a much poorer festival by 2016. You could possibly make an argument that the drop on ticket sales coincided with more pop and less rock acts being booked, similar to Glastonbury over the last few years, but I don’t really see that affecting Glastonbury in the same way.

I do think this years resale was a bit easier but I think that was mostly because we haven’t had a Glastonbury for almost three years now. It doesn’t affect people like us, we’ll try and go every year no matter what, but it’s obviously going to cause a drop in people seeing it on the TV and deciding to try for tickets in October. Most people also haven’t been able to get away on holiday for a couple of years now, that might take priority over a few days camping for some people too. I think the 2023 sale will be as hard as ever and I don’t really see demand reducing much anytime soon.

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4 hours ago, Matt42 said:

It’s like @thewayiam writes a sentence and then throws the words into a randomiser and still publishes the sentence. 

Are you really pulling people up given you've talked more shit about being 'in the know' and what positions acts are playing at festivals in the last 6 months than Boris has about covid!

You had to take yourself about due to your own idiocy as pointed out by many for a while......in other words about 12 hours.

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14 minutes ago, kingcrawler said:

T in the Park is an interesting one, sold out on the day for several years until 2012 when the lineup was a clear downgrade on the previous years. Once they lost the hype of tickets selling out quickly they never really recovered and between that and the progressive downsizing of everything over the next few years, it was a much poorer festival by 2016. You could possibly make an argument that the drop on ticket sales coincided with more pop and less rock acts being booked, similar to Glastonbury over the last few years, but I don’t really see that affecting Glastonbury in the same way.

I do think this years resale was a bit easier but I think that was mostly because we haven’t had a Glastonbury for almost three years now. It doesn’t affect people like us, we’ll try and go every year no matter what, but it’s obviously going to cause a drop in people seeing it on the TV and deciding to try for tickets in October. Most people also haven’t been able to get away on holiday for a couple of years now, that might take priority over a few days camping for some people too. I think the 2023 sale will be as hard as ever and I don’t really see demand reducing much anytime soon.

I think the remoteness of T meant that once it lost its steam, it was hard for it to try and regain it.

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42 minutes ago, mcshed said:

If T had been able to stay at Balado it would still be going.

Yeah probs. Strathallan was awful 

 

43 minutes ago, kingcrawler said:

T in the Park is an interesting one, sold out on the day for several years until 2012 when the lineup was a clear downgrade on the previous years. Once they lost the hype of tickets selling out quickly they never really recovered and between that and the progressive downsizing of everything over the next few years, it was a much poorer festival by 2016. You could possibly make an argument that the drop on ticket sales coincided with more pop and less rock acts being booked, similar to Glastonbury over the last few years, but I don’t really see that affecting Glastonbury in the same way.

I do think this years resale was a bit easier but I think that was mostly because we haven’t had a Glastonbury for almost three years now. It doesn’t affect people like us, we’ll try and go every year no matter what, but it’s obviously going to cause a drop in people seeing it on the TV and deciding to try for tickets in October. Most people also haven’t been able to get away on holiday for a couple of years now, that might take priority over a few days camping for some people too. I think the 2023 sale will be as hard as ever and I don’t really see demand reducing much anytime soon.

will never understand how that 2011 lineup could be so good and stacked then so much worse one year later 

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Just now, fraybentos1 said:

Yeah probs. Strathallan was awful 

 

will never understand how that 2011 lineup could be so good and stacked then so much worse one year later 

2012 was the first year I went, unfortunately missed the great lineups and managed to have the worst festival weather I’ve seen. I agree that TITP would still be going if it was in Balado but I think it would have continued on a slow decline, rather than the fairly rapid ending when it moved.

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I honestly think V sank for different reasons tbh. The lineups started declining in quality and they used to recycle bands like mad. I don’t think it’s just about them booking more and more pop but the lineups themselves just got very bland and uninspired.

Only so many times you can book bands like the Script, Stereophonics, The Killers, Olly Murs, Kings of Leon every year.

Edited by Matt42
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3 hours ago, tarw said:

I have just turned 60 and every year I don’t know half of the acts on the poster. I just listen to @Brave Sir Robin’s playlist and I discover lots of new music.
My tastes have changed over the years but I still find more than enough to sate me at glastonbury. 
 

To me there is a much more diverse and better quality of music now than when I was younger. 
 

I don’t think you will get out of touch with 

music because you obviously love it so much, but maybe you’ll mellow a bit and not be so dogmatic 

It wasn't entirely different when I was younger in terms of how many I knew, without the benefit of @Brave Sir Robin s playlist or being able to play anything instantaneously from t'internet.

Relying on whether you'd bought them, heard on radio or seen them on the tube or whatever.

There's maybe half a dozen I'd have cherry picked from this, quite a few I'd not have cared about, but the majority I'd have just been prepared to spend some time there without knowing anything, in some cases they were to my taste or great, but in other cases not. 

1987Poster.jpg

These days there's simply so many more stages and acts, I can fairly easily listen to the list and fill a clashfinder with interesting stuff. 

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The thing that Glastonbury has going for it that almost no other festival has, is that they've created an environment that everyone wants to spend time in no matter who is on the bill.  I was having a cup of tea one evening in the Healing Fields with a woman about 25 years my senior a few years back and she told me she'd been to every single Glastonbury apart from 3 or 4 of them.  She said she hadn't watched any of the bands in years, and didn't really plan to.  She just wants to be there.  It's the Glastonbury spirit we all talk about, you know?  I've never heard anyone talk about the "V Festival Spirit" or lord help us all, the "Coachella Spirit" - it doesn't exist - at least not in the same way.  Those festivals have to rely on the bands to help them sell their overpriced tickets and takeaway food. 

Increasingly, (and speaking as an american here) I think we are seeing the worst parts of capitalism in our everyday lives, and that in conjunction with some terrible global events taking place, and being surrounded by so much inauthenticity in media - of course Glastonbury sells out in 10 minutes. I'm not saying that the festival is by any means this utopian society or anything, but I think a lot of you will agree with me that when you get on that farm, it's like a salve. And then to know that so many people had to come together to make this thing, this CITY, that only exists for 5 days a year... it's mind blowing. 

One year I was camping next to first timers, and on the Monday morning as we were all putting our tents away I asked them how their festival was.  They said "Do you know that in the entire 5 days we didn't hear anyone having an argument about anything?"  It struck me - I'd never thought about that, but as it happened I don't think I did either.  Now I pay attention to that when I'm there, and it's the strangest thing.  I don't think I've overheard an argument there ever.  I mean, of course people have argued at Glasto, but when you think 200,000 people, half of them exhausted and drinking and taking all kinds of things... Disney needs to drop that "Happiest Place on Earth" BS because it sure isn't Disney - my money's on Glasto.  

ok end rant lol 

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5 hours ago, Olshansky said:

The thing that Glastonbury has going for it that almost no other festival has, is that they've created an environment that everyone wants to spend time in no matter who is on the bill.  I was having a cup of tea one evening in the Healing Fields with a woman about 25 years my senior a few years back and she told me she'd been to every single Glastonbury apart from 3 or 4 of them.  She said she hadn't watched any of the bands in years, and didn't really plan to.  She just wants to be there.  It's the Glastonbury spirit we all talk about, you know?  I've never heard anyone talk about the "V Festival Spirit" or lord help us all, the "Coachella Spirit" - it doesn't exist - at least not in the same way.  Those festivals have to rely on the bands to help them sell their overpriced tickets and takeaway food. 

Increasingly, (and speaking as an american here) I think we are seeing the worst parts of capitalism in our everyday lives, and that in conjunction with some terrible global events taking place, and being surrounded by so much inauthenticity in media - of course Glastonbury sells out in 10 minutes. I'm not saying that the festival is by any means this utopian society or anything, but I think a lot of you will agree with me that when you get on that farm, it's like a salve. And then to know that so many people had to come together to make this thing, this CITY, that only exists for 5 days a year... it's mind blowing. 

One year I was camping next to first timers, and on the Monday morning as we were all putting our tents away I asked them how their festival was.  They said "Do you know that in the entire 5 days we didn't hear anyone having an argument about anything?"  It struck me - I'd never thought about that, but as it happened I don't think I did either.  Now I pay attention to that when I'm there, and it's the strangest thing.  I don't think I've overheard an argument there ever.  I mean, of course people have argued at Glasto, but when you think 200,000 people, half of them exhausted and drinking and taking all kinds of things... Disney needs to drop that "Happiest Place on Earth" BS because it sure isn't Disney - my money's on Glasto.  

ok end rant lol 

Yep that Glasto spirit needs bottling for sure. I always try and describe it but never really manage to but I do think there is something just more unique about a family inviting you to their home for a week and putting on the greatest entertainment they can muster not because they want to make a quick buck but because they want to try and help a lot of charities. I also find that when I am there I marvel at how tolerant they are. You have a dairy farmer who lets people out up stickers saying veganism is the only way. They put on lots of bands/acts that you know absoutely won't be their kind of music. They must put up with so much grief at every stage and honestly when I am there I just think I need to be more Eavis. 

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8 hours ago, thewayiam said:

Are you really pulling people up given you've talked more shit about being 'in the know' and what positions acts are playing at festivals in the last 6 months than Boris has about covid!

You had to take yourself about due to your own idiocy as pointed out by many for a while......in other words about 12 hours.

There’s no point having a pop at Matt when half the forum doesn’t know what you’re on about.

Still curious to understand your definition of “political”…

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Tis a yearly discussion this one. Few things to add. Firstly, that the evolution of the festival has always been in transit. I recall how much resistance there was to dance music seeping into festival in the early 90s. It had stared before, but really began to be a force around this time. I recall my older friends complaining festival had lost its soul and was no longer the alternative festival of indie and underground. Then Britpop, and all the so called negative elements that came with it. Ultimately it was a younger generation of music fans and the previous generation didn't take it too well. 'Not as good as it used to be' is an age old saga. We are by nature a nostalgic bunch. It's a young persons game and we hate to let go. 

On a macro scale, festival decline and the loss of other festivals, is in line with the view that the younger generation, that all festivals need, don't want to see 15 or 20 year indie/rock bands. There are other festivals for this where you take your campervan and caravans as attendees can't sleep in tents at their age 😄

Every year I say I'm too old for this shit. And I probably am... 

 

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12 hours ago, Hugh Jass II said:

My finger slipped off the pulse a long time ago, if it wasn’t for this place I’d know absolutely nothing about modern music. And I’m fine with that.

As Matt said further up, I don’t expect the festival to cater to my 20 years out of date taste.

Yep. I'm 45 and the festival absolutely shouldn't pander to me. There are plenty of festivals out there that do, and I don't want to go to them.

I'm the oldest on my group, the youngest is about 15 years younger, so they help with highlighting good new stuff for me. Although saying that some of them have 'older' taste than me. 

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9 hours ago, thewayiam said:

Are you really pulling people up given you've talked more shit about being 'in the know' and what positions acts are playing at festivals in the last 6 months than Boris has about covid!

You had to take yourself about due to your own idiocy as pointed out by many for a while......in other words about 12 hours.

He may talk shit, but you can at least read it.

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6 hours ago, Olshansky said:

The thing that Glastonbury has going for it that almost no other festival has, is that they've created an environment that everyone wants to spend time in no matter who is on the bill.  I was having a cup of tea one evening in the Healing Fields with a woman about 25 years my senior a few years back and she told me she'd been to every single Glastonbury apart from 3 or 4 of them.  She said she hadn't watched any of the bands in years, and didn't really plan to.  She just wants to be there.  It's the Glastonbury spirit we all talk about, you know?  I've never heard anyone talk about the "V Festival Spirit" or lord help us all, the "Coachella Spirit" - it doesn't exist - at least not in the same way.  Those festivals have to rely on the bands to help them sell their overpriced tickets and takeaway food. 

Increasingly, (and speaking as an american here) I think we are seeing the worst parts of capitalism in our everyday lives, and that in conjunction with some terrible global events taking place, and being surrounded by so much inauthenticity in media - of course Glastonbury sells out in 10 minutes. I'm not saying that the festival is by any means this utopian society or anything, but I think a lot of you will agree with me that when you get on that farm, it's like a salve. And then to know that so many people had to come together to make this thing, this CITY, that only exists for 5 days a year... it's mind blowing. 

One year I was camping next to first timers, and on the Monday morning as we were all putting our tents away I asked them how their festival was.  They said "Do you know that in the entire 5 days we didn't hear anyone having an argument about anything?"  It struck me - I'd never thought about that, but as it happened I don't think I did either.  Now I pay attention to that when I'm there, and it's the strangest thing.  I don't think I've overheard an argument there ever.  I mean, of course people have argued at Glasto, but when you think 200,000 people, half of them exhausted and drinking and taking all kinds of things... Disney needs to drop that "Happiest Place on Earth" BS because it sure isn't Disney - my money's on Glasto.  

ok end rant lol 

I watched Lost in Vagueness (again) this weekend and Kae Tempest says at the end

 ...when you see someone in a state lying in the mud at Glastonbury...you pick them up, give them some water, make sure they're ok, we should be doing that outside of the five days of the festival in the real world too. 

 

 

 

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