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Future of festivals...


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10 minutes ago, parsonjack said:

The Event Management Plan has to include detail of Medical, Welfare, Entry policy etc so any Covid measures will likely need to be in there.  It's required to be submitted 180 days before festival commences which would make it 25th December, unless there is any dispensation to define such measures later as situation determines.

It hasn't worked like that for the small number of festivals which have gone ahead this summer, or have planned to go ahead before a late-ish cancellation, so I don't think that will be a festival-breaker.

And as things stand councils are able to revoke a licence if they're not happy, so I reckon a commitment to do whatever is appropriate at the time of the fest will be enough to get past that fixed date.

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Definitely- I am young and healthy so covid doesnt really matter much to me. I would probably do my own test a couple of days before, then if it was positive maybe wear a mask all weekend and sleep in

Would it be feasible just to simply say, if you are over about 50 and/or have underlying health issues, just stay the fuck at home and dont go to festivals until we have a vaccine in place? Its not th

Quite. Given that the deposits will be ~18 months old by the time any decision comes, and a precedent of sorts was set the first time, there'd be a far stronger case to roll peoples deposits over

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10 minutes ago, eFestivals said:

It hasn't worked like that for the small number of festivals which have gone ahead this summer, or have planned to go ahead before a late-ish cancellation, so I don't think that will be a festival-breaker.

And as things stand councils are able to revoke a licence if they're not happy, so I reckon a commitment to do whatever is appropriate at the time of the fest will be enough to get past that fixed date.

Good points......and a submission of an EMP by 25th Dec doesn't guarantee it will happen, it's just an intent that could be rescinded later.  GFL could still submit one even if they have doubts about it happening.

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1 hour ago, music fan said:

But now after hearing Rishi's statement that these restrictions are going to last for AT LEAST another 6 months, I'm not feeling so optimistic now.  This could all drag out until at least April or May next year and we're going to see a lot of festival organisers cancelling their festivals by then, due to this uncertainty.

 

I don't want to be negative, but I'm more concerned about all the independent parts that make up Glastonbury and other festivals at the moment. 

What's still going to be available by the time festivals come back?  Staging companies, sound and light engineers, techies, traders, food vendors, equipment suppliers and so on.

 

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3 minutes ago, stuie said:

 

I don't want to be negative, but I'm more concerned about all the independent parts that make up Glastonbury and other festivals at the moment. 

What's still going to be available by the time festivals come back?  Staging companies, sound and light engineers, techies, traders, food vendors, equipment suppliers and so on.

 

This got me thinking, Glastonbury is well known for it's charitable contributions and I know the likes of Oxfam and Wateraid are the most well known recipients but is there anything they can do to financially help some of the festival related businesses in the industries mentioned above?

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3 minutes ago, stuie said:

 

I don't want to be negative, but I'm more concerned about all the independent parts that make up Glastonbury and other festivals at the moment. 

What's still going to be available by the time festivals come back?  Staging companies, sound and light engineers, techies, traders, food vendors, equipment suppliers and so on.

 

In theory it shouldn't be an issue. Even if (say) a staging company goes bust, the stages still exist and someone will buy them and be available.

And staff will either be unemployed and able to come back, or will take another job and come back if they want to. If they don't want to then there's plenty of others keen to get into an exciting business.

In theory. 

The reality would be plenty of disruption but I don't think it'll make things impossible.

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29 minutes ago, JoeyT said:

This got me thinking, Glastonbury is well known for it's charitable contributions and I know the likes of Oxfam and Wateraid are the most well known recipients but is there anything they can do to financially help some of the festival related businesses in the industries mentioned above?

I had similar thoughts, especially around the impact if 2021 has to be pulled.  For 2020 GFL simply rolled over tickets for those who wished to retain them but would they do the same if 2021 has to be postponed?  Could there be a case for a scheme where 2020 deposits are either returned, rolled over, or can be forfeited to benefit the charities and related businesses in return for a guaranteed 2022 ticket, with a new deposit to be paid at the appropriate time?

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6 minutes ago, eFestivals said:

In theory it shouldn't be an issue. Even if (say) a staging company goes bust, the stages still exist and someone will buy them and be available.

And staff will either be unemployed and able to come back, or will take another job and come back if they want to. If they don't want to then there's plenty of others keen to get into an exciting business.

In theory. 

The reality would be plenty of disruption but I don't think it'll make things impossible.

The problem comes when Simon at Serious Stages is let go and finds another job in a sector that's not as affected and doesn't want to quit his new job to come back.  Or the storage becomes too expensive and gear ends up in landfill.  I agree it can come back, but a bit like a stopped heart, the longer we leave it, the harder it will be to bring back.

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6 minutes ago, parsonjack said:

I had similar thoughts, especially around the impact if 2021 has to be pulled.  For 2020 GFL simply rolled over tickets for those who wished to retain them but would they do the same if 2021 has to be postponed?  Could there be a case for a scheme where 2020 deposits are either returned, rolled over, or can be forfeited to benefit the charities and related businesses in return for a guaranteed 2021 ticket, with a new deposit to be paid at the appropriate time?

Great idea!

I know everyone is in a different position but I'd more than happily let them keep / redistribute my £50 for a guaranteed ticket the following year.

How many tickets were sold in back in October 2019? Even working from a 100,000 it's 5 million quid the festival has (+ associated interest that gains I assume?)

If as little as 20% opted for the above scheme it would be £1million to share between the various charities & businesses.

 

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13 minutes ago, JoeyT said:

Great idea!

I know everyone is in a different position but I'd more than happily let them keep / redistribute my £50 for a guaranteed ticket the following year.

How many tickets were sold in back in October 2019? Even working from a 100,000 it's 5 million quid the festival has (+ associated interest that gains I assume?)

If as little as 20% opted for the above scheme it would be £1million to share between the various charities & businesses.

 

Just re-read my post and updated...obviously I mean a guaranteed ticket for 2022 not 2021...duh.

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This is Promising at least. If a major airline such as United is starting to implement rapid tests and also the option of an at home kit, others could partner with the company that makes them and use em. They got plenty of time to prepare.
 

https://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/airline-news/2020/09/24/united-airlines-introduces-covid-19-rapid-testing-program-hawaii/3515043001/

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19 minutes ago, Madyaker said:

They will roll the tickets over again if they have to. There’s no way they’ll be refunding all that cash. 

Agreed....same as for 2020 then....but with a further option to forfeit your deposit to support causes and businesses the festival supports and similarly depends upon. 

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As much as it sounds negative, if this all runs for the 6 months then 3 months post that to host 200k people in one place where they walk where they want I think is very unlikely. This seems to be a big feeling on social media platforms as well.

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1 hour ago, thewayiam said:

As much as it sounds negative, if this all runs for the 6 months then 3 months post that to host 200k people in one place where they walk where they want I think is very unlikely. This seems to be a big feeling on social media platforms as well.

How the hell have you got -2075 reputation 😮

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Sorry to be looking like Captain Pessimistic, but I'm just trying to manage my own expectations for next year.

Chatting to friends of mine who are much more involved than I am are starting to feel somewhat less hopeful for events next year, Glastonbury in particular as it is one of the earlier ones.

For some of them, Glastonbury is their major earner of the year.

Finges crossed.

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8 hours ago, Sawdusty Surfer said:

Sorry to be looking like Captain Pessimistic, but I'm just trying to manage my own expectations for next year.

don't forget to include in your thinking that WHO expect at least one vaccine to start being rolled out before the end of the year. If that happens that puts a hugely different spin on things.  

That might not happen of course. But if it does it's a game changer and there's every reason to be hopeful about it.

Mass testing is much less of a game changer for festivals with as many days as Glastonbury. One test sort-of covers you as safe for the next 3 days, but not for 5 days.

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I worry about the coach situation - by rolling over the coach deposits, what will they do if coach capacity is severely reduced due to social distancing measures? How do they account for that possible variable (who knows what public transport rules will be at that point). 

 

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8 minutes ago, Mr.Tease said:

I worry about the coach situation - by rolling over the coach deposits, what will they do if coach capacity is severely reduced due to social distancing measures? How do they account for that possible variable (who knows what public transport rules will be at that point). 

 

It only happens without social distancing.

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I've seen the coach question raised before, but I don't think it's an issue really. You'd just have to wear masks on the coach. I say this because I've got the tube, train and bus several times now and there's nothing stopping them being filled to capacity any more. Don't see why coaches now would be any different?

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1 hour ago, Mr.Tease said:

I worry about the coach situation - by rolling over the coach deposits, what will they do if coach capacity is severely reduced due to social distancing measures? How do they account for that possible variable (who knows what public transport rules will be at that point). 

 

good point.

Tho I guess it's easy enough to make them normal tickets for around half of those coachies . more than enough people will be happy to change.

It creates more traffic of course, but nothing the area hasn't experienced before. As a one-off special case it'll probably be allowed.

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41 minutes ago, Zoo Music Girl said:

I've seen the coach question raised before, but I don't think it's an issue really. You'd just have to wear masks on the coach. I say this because I've got the tube, train and bus several times now and there's nothing stopping them being filled to capacity any more. Don't see why coaches now would be any different?

Personally I haven't used public transport recently but that's silly. Filling to capacity is not helping and they might as well abandon the distance rule.

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43 minutes ago, Zoo Music Girl said:

I've seen the coach question raised before, but I don't think it's an issue really. You'd just have to wear masks on the coach. I say this because I've got the tube, train and bus several times now and there's nothing stopping them being filled to capacity any more. Don't see why coaches now would be any different?

I didn't realise they'd scrapped the empty seats on public transport, surely they'll bring them back soon?! 

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2 minutes ago, Mr.Tease said:

I didn't realise they'd scrapped the empty seats on public transport, surely they'll bring them back soon?! 

I'd never seen enforced empty seats in London (although I didn't use transport really until June) but there's none of that now. Did see some suggested empty seats on buses out of London but these were just signs, not tape or anything. I've got trains out of London three or four times now and seen no restrictions at all about where to sit. 

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a bit of hope, maybe, via a letter to the Guardian. It'll be interesting to see how the 2nd wave goes in London, cos it might prove this true...

=================

Your article (‘Confounding’: Covid may have already peaked in many African countries, 16 September) hints that there may be natural immunity in African countries where Covid-19 has settled down. This is likely to be true, and not just in Africa. If the evidence is closely examined, up to half of the worldwide population may have natural immunity. In none of the natural “experiments” of Sars-CoV-2 exposure within a closed group has the infection rate risen above 50%. In Lombardy, a study of 5,484 individuals who had been exposed by close contact with an infected individual were tested for antibody positivity, with 51.5% testing positive.

This hints at pre-existing natural immunity in the population. This has been convincingly demonstrated, with a study in Nature showing that 35% of a population cohort using historical samples had demonstrable CD4 T cell activity against Sars-CoV-2, never having been previously exposed to the new virus.

The implication is that 35%-50% of the population is naturally immune, and up to 25% antibody prevalence is being approached in some areas of the world (17.5% in London). We could already be approaching 75% immunity in those regions, well within the estimated 60%-80% needed for herd immunity. So, where death rates have settled to historical norms, this would be explicable by natural immunity. We may be closer to the end of this pandemic than we think.
Prof Moin Saleem
University of Bristol

Edited by eFestivals
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