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When will this shit end?


Chrisp1986

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5 minutes ago, stuartbert two hats said:

I think it may, but as I think other people were getting at, the football has been a pretty good testing ground for a looser regime.

 

It may surprise a few on here, but I'm occasionally prone to wild outbursts of optimism (you can find me being wrong in my hopeful predictions many times on this thread). So I'm going to predict the next loosening will raise the ceiling, but not by much and then cases will drop. The models are being pessimistic and everything will be fine.

Ha I agree with you! But then I've always been Mr positive. 

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5 minutes ago, zahidf said:

He was bought in to get restrictions gone...

But.... looking long term, I think its a mistake to see social distancing regulations being implemented as a way to stop high hospital demand. Because it will always be with us or a possibility going forwards

(I don't really give a crap about maths either way)

Going forward we could properly fund the NHS so when demand increases the NHS isn’t at risk of collapsing.

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2 hours ago, DeanoL said:

In normal times. Speak to doctors and nurses.

The NHS isn't just a machine. It's a load of human beings, human beings that have been under intense stress and pressure for over a year now. It's not just a case of saying "capacity is X, as long as we're below X, it's fine".

Think of the busiest, most high pressure week you've ever had at work. Now imagine working that week for a year straight. Then just when it comes to an end people start going "nah it's fine, they've shown they can do this, let's keep the pressure up".

I'm not saying that's a reason to stay shut down, or delay reopening or anything like that. But it's may be a reason to think about what you're saying and how you're framing it. It's people, not mechanisms. People can flex, and work extra hours, but only to a point and only for so long.

It not just that clinical staff don’t just become doctors and nurses and that’s it there is years of development to move up the ranks. Most juniors have had to forgo training and progression in the last year, if you continue to do that then that might have additional patient impact in the future. 

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In around 2010 the nhs was able to operate at around 85% capacity in Summer and closer to 95% in winter. This mean if operations or procedures were cancelled in winter then they could be done in the summer. 
 

as part of austerity that spare capacity was removed as “efficiently savings”. 

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1 hour ago, Ozanne said:

 

 

1 hour ago, zahidf said:

He was bought in to get restrictions gone...

But.... looking long term, I think its a mistake to see social distancing regulations being implemented as a way to stop high hospital demand. Because it will always be with us or a possibility going forwards

(I don't really give a crap about maths either way)

I agree here - that front page doesn't even mention that it's not really covid at this moment causing that problem. It makes out it is, or let's people believe that at least. If restrictions happen because the NHS is under pressure, And the NHS is under pressure because of the effects of lockdowns and the underfunding by the government. The government won't change, and if the answer is more lockdowns then there isn't really an end point there...

Edited by efcfanwirral
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11 minutes ago, dotdash79 said:

Stop me if you have heard this one before …..

 

"Ultimately I trust people and businesses to make the right decisions for themselves" 

Arrogant tosser. I don't give a fuck who or what you trust. I certainly don't trust you. 

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4 hours ago, DeanoL said:

In normal times. Speak to doctors and nurses.

The NHS isn't just a machine. It's a load of human beings, human beings that have been under intense stress and pressure for over a year now. It's not just a case of saying "capacity is X, as long as we're below X, it's fine".

Think of the busiest, most high pressure week you've ever had at work. Now imagine working that week for a year straight. Then just when it comes to an end people start going "nah it's fine, they've shown they can do this, let's keep the pressure up".

I'm not saying that's a reason to stay shut down, or delay reopening or anything like that. But it's may be a reason to think about what you're saying and how you're framing it. It's people, not mechanisms. People can flex, and work extra hours, but only to a point and only for so long.

Beds are blocked in the NHS all year round because they can't get people out of hospital that is a pressure on the NHS and it impacts patients.

People are part of a mechanism we could build more physical capacity and have more beds but you have to be able to staff them if you could staff them what do you then do with these staff which when according to you there isn't pressure on the NHS? Pay them look at empty beds? Hire season staff? 

THe NHS hasn't been at breaking point for 18 months solid parts of the NHS have had really really terrible times of it but the NHS as an entire ecosystem is not about to collapse. 

At the height of the pandemic in London 999 calls were answered by neighboring ambulance services and neighboring services had assets in London responding to 999 calls that is how the system is designed to flex and that is not the present situation. 

The elephant in the room is how do you stop people self isolating and therefore not answering 999 calls or emergency services having to isolate just incase they become infectious. 

 

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1 hour ago, dotdash79 said:

In around 2010 the nhs was able to operate at around 85% capacity in Summer and closer to 95% in winter. This mean if operations or procedures were cancelled in winter then they could be done in the summer. 
 

as part of austerity that spare capacity was removed as “efficiently savings”. 

Despite an 11% reduction in bed numbers, bed occupancy rate rose by 1% though. 

The NHS is amazing but if you gave it a blank cheque it could still spend more and you can't run any public service like that it just doesn't work.

Edited by RobertProsineckisLighter
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