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waterfalls21234

nine inch nails doing a us tour with physical tickets from box offices only.....opinions?

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15 minutes ago, Odessa said:

It's just a silly argument though about the "most determined". I'm very determined to go to All Points East and the QOTSA gig in London this summer, as well as TRNSMT in Glasgow. I wouldn't have travelled to London twice and Glasgow once just to buy tickets though, the idea of having to do that to "prove" I want to go is absolutely absurd.

what you're proving is the limits of your determination.

You can chose to be determined enough so you make the two trips, or if you're less determined you won't make the two trips.

Edited by eFestivals

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1 minute ago, eFestivals said:

what you're proving is the limits of what you say is your determination.

You can chose to be determined enough so you make the two trips, or if you're less determined you won't make the two trips.

You're really gonna argue it would have been reasonable for them to ask me to travel across the country 3 times already this year just to buy tickets? When we have the internet?

I've just had an email about Arctic Monkeys at the Royal Albert Hall too which I'm tempted for. That would be another trip to London to try (emphasis on try with this one) to get tickets. Madness.

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Just now, Odessa said:

You're really gonna argue it would have been reasonable for them to ask me to travel across the country 3 times already this year just to buy tickets? When we have the internet?

it's more reasonable than you thinking they shouldn't have the right to do it.

After all, it's their shows, their tickets, and their fans. If their fans want to hate them for it, it's also their consequence.

 

Just now, Odessa said:

I've just had an email about Arctic Monkeys at the Royal Albert Hall too which I'm tempted for. That would be another trip to London to try (emphasis on try with this one) to get tickets. Madness.

I've not anywhere said that I think all tickets should be sold this way. :)

All i've said is that if a band wants to, why not? It has its upsides as well as downsides, from their perspective as well as for the potential buyers.

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Still easy for a tout to queue themselves and buy 4 tickets though. 

This method also removes any possibility of people travelling to see the band. I love seeing people from other countries in Dublin for a gig. Or any city where there are people not from that city. And I've traveled abroad loads of times for gigs. Because the band aren't playing here or because the gig was in a great city or venue. 

I like them trying something new but I can't see this one catching on.

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The band can do what they like and have every right to construct a system that promotes a certain kind of punter over another.

But making it "box office only" promotes a clientele local to the venue, far more than it promotes more dedicated fans. Again no value judgement here, but let's not get confused about what a system like this will achieve.

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12 minutes ago, stuartbert two hats said:

But making it "box office only" promotes a clientele local to the venue, far more than it promotes more dedicated fans.

I don't think that can be said with certainty (for the over-subscribed gigs), it's not like people from the sticks never went to gigs in the past.

And perhaps, because it was that bigger effort to achieve and might have had to been done at the expense of something else, it was a more-appreciated experience?

But hey, first world problems. Tickets must be sold in a method I approve of. :P

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1 minute ago, eFestivals said:

I don't think that can be said with certainty (for the over-subscribed gigs), it's not like people from the sticks never went to gigs in the past.

And perhaps, because it was that bigger effort to achieve and might have had to been done at the expense of something else, it was a more-appreciated experience?

But hey, first world problems. Tickets must be sold in a method I approve of. :P

Was the demand there for gigs like it is now though? All I hear about is how Glasto never used to sell out etc, so you could probably just pick up a ticket next time you were in HMV at a time that suits you. Rather than have to get there as soon as it goes on sale. So it's not really a fair comparison.

And it was mentioned the other day about posting applications for tickets, so I assume that was done for high demand stuff. How often did people actually need to queue at a certain time or miss out?

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17 minutes ago, Odessa said:

Was the demand there for gigs like it is now though?

nope. Perhaps because people had to spend extra on travelling to get tickets. :P

(more truthfully, there was a lesser scene because compared to now the whole live music thing for touring bands [outside of pubs were you could always buy on the night] was still in its infancy. Seeing stage & venue set-ups from the late 70s looks prehistoric)

I don't disagree that's terribly inefficient and not the modern-day norm, but hey, why should all that money be easily channelled to music stars by getting people to Peak-Gig, when the money might be spread around a bit more by their music-want having other attached expenses? And it's not like it's valueless, my missus has lots of stories of her queuing-for-tickets days (often overnight), a whole experience in themselves.

Just because of how it's structured today doesn't mean that's how it has to be or even should be. 

17 minutes ago, Odessa said:

All I hear about is how Glasto never used to sell out etc, so you could probably just pick up a ticket next time you were in HMV at a time that suits you.

those days had gone before internet ticketing arrived. The slow-sell pre-1995 was about the much-lesser popularity of festivals and nothing to do with how the tickets were sold.

17 minutes ago, Odessa said:

And it was mentioned the other day about posting applications for tickets, so I assume that was done for high demand stuff. How often did people actually need to queue at a certain time or miss out?

the high demand stuff was when people queued. It was the only way to guarantee tickets.

The no-sell-out stuff could safety be done by post - tho more-normal was local-town outlets, in record shops, whatever.

Edited by eFestivals

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49 minutes ago, eFestivals said:

But hey, first world problems. Tickets must be sold in a method I approve of. :P

That has nothing to do with my comment. I was pretty clear that  approval or disapproval was irrelevant to the points I was making.

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6 minutes ago, stuartbert two hats said:

That has nothing to do with my comment. I was pretty clear that  approval or disapproval was irrelevant to the points I was making.

You're right, it does have nothing - or little, anyway - to do with your comment. I deliberately worded it back at me, rather than as you. :)

It was a more general light-hearted comment on the overall flavour of many comments, with people having such strong opinions on a sale that doesn't even affect any of us (cos its in the USA).

I guess I'm coming from a different angle to most cos even back in the day it wasn't something that really concerned me. I was far too cool to be buying tickets to see a popular band. :P

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Just cos you got by fine back in the day doesn't mean we should disregard decades of progress to use an exclusive, redundant system. Might as well go back to using, er... fax machines? Horse & carriages? 

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2 hours ago, eFestivals said:

You're right, it does have nothing - or little, anyway - to do with your comment. I deliberately worded it back at me, rather than as you. :)

It was a more general light-hearted comment on the overall flavour of many comments, with people having such strong opinions on a sale that doesn't even affect any of us (cos its in the USA).

I guess I'm coming from a different angle to most cos even back in the day it wasn't something that really concerned me. I was far too cool to be buying tickets to see a popular band. :P

Ha! :D

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I remember queuing overnight in a alley behind Birmingham Odeon for Simple Minds tickets (it was that three weeks in the 80s when they were a big deal)  It was quite fun really, there were loads of people and it turned into quite a party. Ah well.... times change.

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11 hours ago, Mash011 said:

Just cos you got by fine back in the day doesn't mean we should disregard decades of progress to use an exclusive, redundant system. Might as well go back to using, er... fax machines? Horse & carriages? 

*ALL* sold out gigs by-nature are exclusive. The clue is in the word 'exclusive'; and the fact that some people are excluded. :P

And it's only progress if it works better for you personally. For anyone who is more-disadvantaged by internet buying, it's regressive. There is only personal opinion.

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2 hours ago, John the Moth said:

I remember queuing overnight in a alley behind Birmingham Odeon for Simple Minds tickets (it was that three weeks in the 80s when they were a big deal)  It was quite fun really, there were loads of people and it turned into quite a party. Ah well.... times change.

I queued down that same alley in the mid '80s for Iron Maiden (!?). I think we came in on the first train for a 10:00 start and it was all part of the experience. It was great fun for an idiot teenager.

Edited by Fishman
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8 hours ago, Fishman said:

I queued down that same alley in the mid '80s for Iron Maiden (!?). I think we came in on the first train for a 10:00 start and it was all part of the experience. It was great fun for an idiot teenager.

Me too, I've 'over nighted' there a few times queuing for tickets in the early 80's.....marvellous fun.  The overnight queue for Genesis tickets, a frosty night in 1980 snaked it's way all around the Bullring and back up New Street, we was on the telly all day. :D

I also managed to get the elusive A12 ticket a couple of times by queuing overnight!

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well the band have just been revealed as hypocritical morons anyway 

hate techonlogy do they? hate the way weve come to depend on it do they?

well why the fuck have they just had a spotify only sale for their new ltd edition lp?  

you couldnt make it up! hate it unless they can make money for it I guess lol
 

 

Edited by waterfalls21234

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