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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/12/2010 in Blog Entries

  1. 1 point
    Festival season is almost here again, and it’s important to stay safe while having fun. In 2015, it was estimated that one in every 500 festivalgoers were victims of crime. People looking to enjoy a summer enjoying live music and an exciting community atmosphere also need to be aware of the security risks. Fuad Zain, Centre Owner of First Security Training, shares some top tips to keep you safe throughout the festival season. 1. Find out where the security are. People tend to behave better when they think they’re being watched. If you pitch your tent near to where security staff are posted, it is likely to remain safer. You’ll also be safe in the knowledge that if any trouble does start, the security won’t be too far away to come to your aid. 2. Find out where the medical tent is. In an emergency, you’ll be glad to get there quickly. Make sure you know exactly where to get help if you or one of your party is injured. If in doubt, you can ask security, and they’ll help you find the medical team. Many security staff also have first aid training, so may be able to help too. 3. Drug Awareness. Festivals are a hotspot for drugs. Last year, three deaths at Leeds Festival and T in the Park were linked to drug use, and a number of assaults have been linked to drink spiking. Some festivals, such as Leeds and Reading, have announced they will have a drug-testing tent, to ensure the safety of festivalgoers. If you suspect you or a friend has been spiked, you should seek help from the first aid tent or a member of security immediately. 4. Stick to busy areas of the festival. Safety in numbers is key here. Avoid the lonely, secluded spots, as this is a prime spot for criminals. Someone on their own is a much easier target than someone surrounded by people, however… 5. Be conscious of pickpockets, busy areas are great for these guys. Try not to carry too much money in one place about your person. Also, a great tip is to pick up an old mobile and leave your smartphone at home. Not only will it be less desirable for thieves but the battery will last forever. 6. Watch what you drink. Drunk people are far easier to take advantage of. If you’re lucky, you’ll get a festival heatwave, but beware, the heat can make any alcohol go straight to your head. Of course you should have fun, but make sure you or one of your group is looking out for danger. If you feel that anything is getting out of control, go straight to security for help. 7. Check your car is locked. If you’re driving to the festival, be aware if you lock your car using a key fob. Thieves are increasingly using signal jammers to prevent doors from locking when the fob is pressed, and the owner leaves the car open, allowing the thief to break in easily and steal any valuables. If you spot anything suspicious when parking your car, report it to festival security. 8. Find out what facilities are available. Larger festivals, such as Glastonbury, have free lock ups where you can store your valuables. Also, many festivals have an area for charging your phone, which is an absolute essential if you or one of your group go missing. 9. Tag your property. Go retro and channel your school days by marking up your property with your name and postcode. This will make your items easier to identify if they’re handed in at the Lost Property booth. Festivals like Glastonbury have UV pens you can borrow, if you want to secretly secure your stuff. 10. Make plans with your friends. Not everyone has the same taste in music or entertainment, but make sure you and your group arrange to meet regularly to make sure everyone is safe. If you have any concerns about the safety of any of your party, speak to a member of the security team
  2. 1 point
    So on the 13th of December 2014 I ventured off to the resort of Les Deux in the French Alps! I'm a final year event management student at Bournemouth University and that means one thing...Dissertation time! instead of following the monotonousness regime of making a questionnaire and asking random people to fill it out, I thought, hey! why not get on a plane and go to a festival that's never happened before on my own! So I did! And what an adventure it was. The cost of the trip kind of swayed me once I had booked it as I had to get a credit card to pay the trip off, although I only decided a month before hand that I actually wanted to go.. Anyway, after a few weeks of preparation, buying ski gear and anxiously awaiting my week a lone in the Alps, the day came! Prior to the trip I had posted on the events Facebook page to see if anyone else was going on their own.. I was in luck! A guy called Nick from California was starting his European tour there and another graduate from Cambridge called Zak whose very into his Trance! We spoke for a few weeks and I met zak at the airport, we flew out together, got to the resort at about 10:30 pm local time, by then a lot of people were in the party mood! However i wanted to sleep, My hotel was wayyyy up a hill, bit of a trek but hey I am in the mountains after all! Anyway, I slept, woke up to go to my first ever snow boarding lesson! which was horrible! horrible horrible horrible. I gave up after the first day. However! Zak, the guy I flew over with introduced me to his room mates who were actually very good at snowboarding and they looked after me all week! More to Follow!
  3. 1 point
    Hey guys, Just joined up here, looking to go to my first festival(s) this year, although most of my friends are not into that sort of thing. Would love to meet some other people to go with, I would be travelling from my home town Manchester or uni town Huddersfield. Georgia
  4. 1 point
    The cancellation of some of the more major festivals this year have brought a lot of easy headlines for newspapers and the music press, with a raft of reasons suggested as the cause - the olympics, the recession, poor bookings, expensive tickets, and the like. Those things are of course in the mix and it would be foolish to dismiss the effect they have, but there's much more going on to effect the festivals scene than just those. Back in 2006 I wrote this article titled "Regulation, Retro and Rubbish", and having just revisited it I can see I called much of it right. Regulation has tended to tighten again, the change of licencing laws being just a false dawn. Spontinatity is now only permitted if it's been included in the programme and a full risk assessment is carried out. The freedom that festivals once represented and gave the central appeal to the whole idea is long dead and buried. Retro came and stole the show, and with the dominance of so much dreadful indie landfill it deserved to. But when it goes huge for pop acts like Take That and even Steps can get in on the act then it's time recognise that retro is hitting the bottom of the barrel marked sub-standard, and it's time to move on. And the rubbish - both kinds - have got more rubbish. When The Hop Farm's booking of Bruce Forsyth is the freshest thing to happen in festival bookings for years then it's time for a re-think. I said back then "with festivals now so firmly mainstream that they’re something even your grannie might do, are the fashionable days of festivals numbered?." The grannies have eaten the festivals.
  5. 1 point
    Hi People! Carrying out some research into Environmental issues and the festival industry.... If you have attended a festival in the last 3 years, please feel free to fill out my survey! Heres the link: http://www.surveypirate.com/Survey.aspx?su...HWOFZdzWA%3d%3d Thank you


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